Humbaba


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Humbaba

one-eyed, fire- and plague-breathing monster whose eye could strike men dead. [Babyl. Myth.: Gilgamesh; Benét, 485]
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Gilgamesh decapitates him, and our heroes then cut down the forest and float down the Euphrates on a raft of cedar logs with the head of Humbaba as proof of their victory.
He was about to defeat Humbaba, the guardian of the cedar forest, when Humbaba said, 'Look let's make a deal.
The story of Gilgamesh centers on an enervated and self-centered king who, along with his only friend, Enkidu, declares war against the nature deity, Humbaba, in hopes of securing eternal fame.
Il n'explique pas non plus pourquoi le geant gardien Humbaba possede plusieurs melammus.
Masks of Humbaba (or Huwawa) the Terrible, a demon-monster whose very look brought death, were tools of the trade for Mesopotamian exorcists and magicians.
Moreover, students of every discipline can find texts relevant to them: Gilgamesh's forays into the cedar wood of Humbaba inspires wonder about humans' innate need to destroy nature as a means of asserting mastery over it, and Anaximander's theories that all life originated in the sea inspires awe at the human capacity for logic and critical thinking.
En el informe Women and ICTs in Africa (Carolyn Humbaba, FEMNET, 2012), la brecha de genero en cuanto al acceso a Internet en la zona subsahariana comienza en el 44%, y esta dejando atras las oportunidades de implantar una agencia de nivelacion entre hombres y mujeres mediante la revolucion tecnologica de Internet.
The image of Leviathan in Job has also been seen as deriving from an Ugaritic mythical sea deity called Lotan, but also as possibly borrowing elements from the famous Huwawa / Humbaba in The Epic of Gilgamesh (Kernbach 1989: 297298), decoded by Sitchin as being some kind of mechanical contraption used as a weapon (android/robot) for defending the Cedar Forest, wherein "celestial boats" (spaceships) were kept.
The site of the world's first urban culture dates back 5,000 years, and among the artefacts is this mash of the demon Humbaba, dated 1800-1600 BC.
El rostro del demonio Humbaba (o Huwawa), enemigo de Gilgamesh, es una masa de intestinos (vease ilustracion).
Gilgamesh, who was the ruler of the city-state of Uruk, sought to gain eternal fame by killing the monster Humbaba.
Na grande epopeia acadica de Gilgamesli o relato da morte violenta de Humbaba (assim na lingua semitica) so nos chegou em fragmentos.