Hungarian Revolt

Hungarian Revolt

iron-curtain country futilely resisted Soviet domination (1956). [Eur. Hist.: Van Doren, 553]
References in periodicals archive ?
makes no sense without reference to Wyspianski's play The Wedding, and, finally, the student march in Budapest on October 23, 1956, that led to the uprising had quite different aims than just "commemorating the Hungarian revolt of 1848" against the Austrians, who at the time ruled but had not "occupied" Hungary.
The Arab world is like the old Soviet empire: the Hungarian revolt in the mid-1950s, the 1968 Prague Spring in Czechoslovakia, the 1980 Solidarity movement in Poland, and the Russian dissidents throughout those decades ultimately peaked and broke through in 1989-1990 to engineer the collapse of Soviet authoritarianism.
At that time, "Mr K", as he was known to the world press, was perhaps the most famous man in the world, following his denunciation of Josef Stalin at the 20th Congress of the Soviet Communist Party, and his ruthless crushing of the Hungarian revolt against communism.
Failed Illusions: Moscow, Washington, Budapest, and the 1956 Hungarian Revolt.
Failed Illusions: Moscow, Washington, Budapest and the 1956 Hungarian Revolt, by Charles Gati.
Each retained or sought to retain the one-party system and, with the exception of Gorbachev, was determined to preserve the Soviet empire in Eastern Europe--hence the brutal suppression of the Hungarian revolt and the shutting down of the Czechoslovak reform movement known as the Prague Spring.
In the early hours of the Hungarian revolt, a fairly large number of Russian troops stationed in Budapest defied orders to suppress the rebellion and joined the rebels.
Failed illusions; Moscow, Washington, Budapest, and the 1956 Hungarian revolt.
Documentarian Miklos Gimes grew up wondering about his father, a heroic martyr of the Hungarian revolt, but discovers that the greater mystery is his mother.
Grace; 1921: Death of John Boyd Dunlop, inventor of the pneumatic rubber tyre; 1946: United Nations General Assembly met for the first time in New York; 1954: Britain, US, France and the USSR agreed to end the occupation of Germany; 1956: The Hungarian revolt against Soviet oppression began; 1966: George Blake, serving a 42-year sentence for espionage, escaped from Wormwood Scrubs prison; 1972: Access credit cards were introduced in Britain; 1987: Lester Piggott jailed three years for tax evasion.
After Kronstadt, there were the Purge Trials in the 1930s, the Khrushchev report and the Hungarian revolt in the 1950s, Czechoslovakia in 1968, Solzhenitsyn's revelations about the Gulag in the 1970s, and martial law in Poland in 1982.

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