Hungarian Revolt

(redirected from Hungarian Revolution of 1956)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

Hungarian Revolt

iron-curtain country futilely resisted Soviet domination (1956). [Eur. Hist.: Van Doren, 553]
References in periodicals archive ?
With more than 100 works by four photographers on display, the images of Welsh beaches were taken by renowned documentary photographer David Hurn, who was raised in Cardiff and whose work includes documentation of the Hungarian revolution of 1956 and film stars like Jane Fonda and Sean Connery.
Attila and Zizi in Budapest recount the terror of the Hungarian Revolution of 1956. Les Gordon, the leader of the group, an African-American living in Paris to escape racism, tells of the race massacre in Tulsa, and the heartbreaking Indian Removal under President Andrew Jackson confiscating the lands of the Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Seminole and Muskogee-Creek nations, forcing them through snow and ice to Oklahoma on the Trail of Tears where one out of four died.
This is the description of the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 (HR 1956) in the streets of Hungary.
An overview of the particularly Soviet conception of the rule of law is followed by an analysis of the events leading to -- and the immediate aftermath of -- the Hungarian revolution of 1956, when the Soviet "fraternal" approach to its near-Western neighbors and satellites was first unmasked as a self-serving power grab.
This process happened in the Hungarian Revolution of 1956, the Bay of Pigs in 1961, the Prague Spring of 1968, the contras program in Nicaragua in 1984.
In a lecture at the opening of this exhibition, Kicsiny discussed the prominence of reburial practices in Hungary, citing, in particular, the very public 1989 reburial of the anti-Soviet leader Imre Nagy, who had been executed on Khrushchev's orders after the failed Hungarian Revolution of 1956. The analogy was clear: In Kicsiny's work, too, meaning and history are subject to the eternal return.
Khrushchev's response was reminiscent of how he dealt with the Hungarian Revolution of 1956, a time when he was just consolidating his rule and needed to keep Kremlin hardliners at bay.
Both can be used in class to introduce the immigrant take on the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 and refugee/immigrant life in the United States.
He left native homeland during the Hungarian Revolution of 1956. He was very proud to be a US Citizen of Hungarian descent.
Among the rapturous onlookers was a refugee from the failed Hungarian revolution of 1956, a successful Canadian author and publisher named Anna Porter.
A personal memoir and history of the Hungarian Revolution of 1956, New York: HarperCollins Publishers.
The Mayakovsky-type fierce rhetoric of the "Stalinist" period gave way around 1954 to poems of reckoning with Woroszylski encapsulating his deep disappointment with the USSR in "Cztery zimy" (Four winters) and in "Miasto" (A city), an eyewitness account of the Hungarian Revolution of 1956. In fact, visiting Hungary in the turbulent days of October-November 1956 was an important milestone in Woroszylski's development--his Hungarian Diary, an objective description of his experiences, became a classic of its kind, published repeatedly in samizdat.

Full browser ?