Hunter syndrome

(redirected from Hunter's syndrome)
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Hunter syndrome

[′hənt·ər ‚sin‚drōm]
(medicine)
An X-linked recessive disease in which a deficiency of the enzyme iduronate sulfatase leads to the accumulation of mucopolysaccharides in various body tissues, resulting in developmental abnormalities, skeletal deformations, mental retardation, and, in severe cases, early death. Also known as mucopolysaccharidosis II.
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8232;People with Hunter's syndrome are unable to break down long, sugary molecules called mucopolysaccharides.
According to the BBC on Thursday, the impressive feat comes courtesy of researchers in California who trialled the experimental treatment on a man with Hunter's syndrome.
Daniel was diagnosed with Hunter's Syndrome at the age of three.
Summary: Angie Emara's son, Adam, was just 4 years old when he died from complications of Hunter's Syndrome in 2009.
Half the money raised will go to the Gem Appeal (in aid of sufferers of a genetic disorders) as a friend of Denise's had two boys who died of Hunter's Syndrome, and the other half will go to the Teenage Cancer Trust.
Geraldine and David know that it is Hunter's Syndrome that makes their seven-year-old Ethan prone to violent outbursts but that doesn't make it any easier to deal with the punches.
The kind of care and compassion that Jacob, who suffered from Hunter's Syndrome, desperately needed.
Andrew Wragg, of Worthing, West Sussex, appeared at Chichester Magistrates' Court charged with murdering his 10-year-old son Jacob, who suffered from Hunter's Syndrome.
Some pupils have cerebral palsy or genetic conditions such as Hunter's Syndrome and Down's Syndrome, but all have learning difficulties and can really benefit from taking part in the wealth of activities and lessons Hadrian offers.
Mary Wragg, 41, said her ex-husband told friends, his parents and a very ill girl's mum he would end the life of Jacob, 10, if the condition slowly killing him, Hunter's Syndrome, worsened.