Hunter syndrome


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Hunter syndrome

[′hənt·ər ‚sin‚drōm]
(medicine)
An X-linked recessive disease in which a deficiency of the enzyme iduronate sulfatase leads to the accumulation of mucopolysaccharides in various body tissues, resulting in developmental abnormalities, skeletal deformations, mental retardation, and, in severe cases, early death. Also known as mucopolysaccharidosis II.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Also among the participants were three brothers afflicted with Hunter syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis type II) where an enzyme needed to break down complex sugar in the body is either missing or malfunctioning.
Among those marking the day with the minister was five-year-old Caleb Vandepeer, who is undergoing revoltionary treatment for a genetic disorder called Hunter Syndrome.
Daniel, 12, who lives in High Heaton, Newcastle, with his parents and sister Elle, eight, suffers from Hunter Syndrome.
Andrew Wragg, 38, admitted suffocating Jacob, 10, who had the rare degenerative disease Hunter syndrome, with a pillow at the family home.
But she strongly rejected a claim made during the trial by Wragg's former wife Mary that she did not know her husband was planning to kill Jacob, who was suffering with the degenerative disease Hunter Syndrome, on July 24 2004.
He is charged with murdering Jacob Wragg, ten, who was suffering with the severe degenerative disease Hunter Syndrome.
But the 37-year-old denies murdering Jacob, who suffered with the degenerative disease Hunter Syndrome which affects just one in 150,000 male children.
Former security guard Andrew Wragg, 36, is accused of murdering 10-year-old Jacob, who suffered with Hunter Syndrome.
The youngster suffered from the rare inherited condition Hunter Syndrome which causes progressive physical deterioration and can cause mental retardation and aggressive behaviour.
The youngster, who suffered from the rare inherited condition, Hunter Syndrome, was treated at the address before being taken to Worthing Hospital, where he was pronounced dead.
Hunter of the Canadian Army Medical Corps in 1917; he identified what is now called MPS II, or Hunter syndrome. Gertrude Hurler of Munich first described MPS I in 1919.
Her sons Mikey and Simon died from Hunter syndrome and she wants to spare other families the same agony.

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