hunter-gatherer

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hunter-gatherer

a member of a society which subsists by exploiting non-domestic/wild food resources. This strategy includes the hunting of large and small game animals, fishing, and the collection of various plant foods. A hunter-gatherer typically lives as part of a small camp or BAND made up of kin. The band is generally nomadic, with their movements following the availability of food, and there is a division of labour by age and sex: women collect plant foods and men hunt. Today, barely 30,000 of the world's population live by hunting and gathering, though it has supported life for 99% of humankind's existence.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dogs, they concluded, derived from ancient wolves that inhabited Europe and are now extinct.ayne said that that the domestication of predatory wolves likely occurred among ancient hunter-gatherer groups rather than as part of humans' development of sedentary, agricultural-based communities.
The spread of plants and animals throughout Europe between 6000 and 4000BC involved a complex interplay between indigenous Mesolithic hunter-gatherers and incoming Neolithic farmers but the scale of the interaction and the extent to which hunter-gatherers took ideas from their neighbours remains hotly debated.
"In a tropical and geomorphologically active landscape often considered challenging both for early human occupation and for the preservation of hunter-gatherer sites, the newly discovered shell middens provide evidence for early to middle Holocene occupation and illustrate the potential for identifying and interpreting early open-air archaeological sites in western Amazonia," arcaheologists (http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0072746) noted in their report published in the journal PLoS ONE.
1.5 to 2degC per century, hunter-gatherers in Europe during the Mesolithic era (approximately 11,000-6,000 years ago) experienced significant environmental changes, very similar to the ones we face today: rising sea levels, increased drought, plant and animal migrations, and wildfires.
Shame and its effects are poorly understood in our society, far removed from our hunter-gatherer origins.
Critique: Beautifully illustrated and impressively informative, "Arrowheads, Spears, and Buffalo Jumps: Prehistoric Hunter-Gatherers of the Great Plains" is a thoroughly engaging read from cover to cover and one that is unreservedly recommended for personal, school, and community library American Archaeology collections in general, and Native American History supplemental studies reading lists in particular.
People in Iberia continued to live as hunter-gatherers for thousands of years after that, long after the end of the Ice Age.
class="MsoNormalFrom a public health perspective, modern hunter-gatherers may be most remarkable for their relative lack of chronic diseases like heart disease, hypertension and cancer.
It is believed there are a little over 1,000 Hadza people remaining, forming one of the last hunter-gatherer communities still in existence, and living close to the site of some of the very earliest human remains.
Hunter-gatherer societies treated land as a 'common' resource.
The samples also included DNA from HEabE1/4nhian hunter-gatherers and a Jomon from Japan - a scientific first, revealing a long suspected genetic link between the two populations.
The new finds were discovered some metres away from an earlier hunter-gatherer settlement named Ayios Ioannis/Brescia-Rhoudias, which has been excavated by the same archaeological team for a number of years.