Huppah


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Huppah

(hŭp`ə), in the Bible, chief priest.

huppah

bridal canopy in Jewish weddings. [Judaism: Wigoder, 274]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
or youth "a life of Torah, huppah, and ma'asim tovim," in
Eventually, this would become the modern custom of consecutively performed betrothal, reading of the ketubbah (signed minutes before the betrothal), and, finally, the marriage, with all three ceremonies taking place under the huppah.
Namely, the betrothal was distanced from the engagement by at most three weeks, and the huppah was then postponed for a further six months to a year.
Accordingly, as early as 1506 Judah Mintz qualified his edict insisting on the presence at the huppah and qiddushin of a minyan in order to prevent clandestine marriage by saying that "ve-she-yehiyeh le-da`atah u-ve-retson ha-'ishah ha-mitqadeshet" (the ceremony is to take place at the will and consent of the woman being betrothed).
For example, when parents say goodbye to a child under the huppah, the word sasson is used, because they are of course happy but also sad that their child is leaving home.
For another, we have a long write-up of the Jennifer Miller-Jason Feifer nuptials, disqualified since that happy couple was already featured in Huppah Dreams (on the occasion of a much shorter Times notice) two weeks ago.
This week's couple, Yonahton Bock and Ronald Kaplan, have also already been featured on The Scroll, but, well, it wasn't a Huppah Dreams.
But a new kind of get would end a marriage with a level of spirituality, egalitarianism, and business-like practicality equal to the levels of those qualities that a sensitive and seycheldik Reform rabbi would bring to initiating the marriage under the Huppah.
To distinguish this cup from the erusin cup, it may be passed to all those around the huppah.
While there were several good candidates this week, it has not been lost on us that Huppah Dreams has yet to highlight a same-sex marriage, and we are glad that ends today.
We want to press close to the shiny bride and groom under the huppah, the auspicious roof laden with lavish flowers as the rabbi blesses the couple's future.