John Huston

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John Huston
John Marcellus Huston
Birthday
BirthplaceNevada, Missouri, U.S.
Died
Occupation
Film director, screenwriter, actor

Huston, John

(hyo͞os`tən), 1906–87, American motion picture director, writer, and actor, b. Nevada, Mo. In many of his films, such as The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948) and Moby Dick (1955), Huston focused on groups whose goals are thwarted by greed and cross-purposes. He wrote the screenplays for many of his films, including The Maltese Falcon (1941), the first film he directed. Other films include The Asphalt Jungle (1950), The African Queen (1951), Beat the Devil (1954), The Misfits (1960), Fat City (1972), Wise Blood (1978), and Under the Volcano (1984). An actor as well, he was nominated for an Academy Award for his portrayal of a menacing patriarch in Chinatown (1974).

Bibliography

See his autobiography, An Open Book (1980).

His father was Walter Huston, 1884–1950, American actor, b. Toronto, Ont. A character actor, he starred in Kurt Weill's Knickerbocker Holiday (1938). His films include Dodsworth (1936), All That Money Can Buy (1941), and The Treasure of the Sierra Madre. He won an Academy Award for the last. John Huston's daughter, Anjelica Huston, 1952–, American actress, b. Ireland, worked with her father in Walk with Love and Death (1969), Prizzi's Honor (1985), for which she won an Academy Award, and The Dead (1987). Her other films include Enemies: A Love Story (1989), The Grifters (1990), and The Royal Tenenbaums (2001).

Bibliography

See her memoir, A Story Lately Told (2013)

Huston, John

(1906–87) film director, screenwriter, actor; born in Nevada, Mo. (son of Walter Huston; father of Anjelica Huston). After his acting debut off Broadway in 1925, he held various jobs (including a hitch in the Mexican cavalry) until 1938, when he became a scriptwriter in Hollywood; his hits included Jezebel (1938) and Sergeant York (1941), plus The Maltese Falcon (1941) with which he began his directorial career. After making three documentaries with the Signal Corps in World War II, he made his masterpiece, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1947), for which he won Academy Awards for best director and best screenplay. Later films he both directed and wrote include The Asphalt Jungle (1950), The Red Badge of Courage (1951), The African Queen (1952), and Moby Dick (1956). A noted bon vivant, gambler, sportsman, and ladies' man, he made his base in Ireland from 1952. In his later years he returned to acting in films, and he died while directing The Dead (1987).
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have always been a big people such as John Huston, John Ford and Stanley "He wrote Gran Torino with me and sings on it.
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Starring: Guy Pearce, Ray Winstone, Emily Watson, Danny Huston, John Hurt.