John Huston

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John Huston
John Marcellus Huston
Birthday
BirthplaceNevada, Missouri, U.S.
Died
Occupation
Film director, screenwriter, actor

Huston, John

(hyo͞os`tən), 1906–87, American motion picture director, writer, and actor, b. Nevada, Mo. In many of his films, such as The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948) and Moby Dick (1955), Huston focused on groups whose goals are thwarted by greed and cross-purposes. He wrote the screenplays for many of his films, including The Maltese Falcon (1941), the first film he directed. Other films include The Asphalt Jungle (1950), The African Queen (1951), Beat the Devil (1954), The Misfits (1960), Fat City (1972), Wise Blood (1978), and Under the Volcano (1984). An actor as well, he was nominated for an Academy Award for his portrayal of a menacing patriarch in Chinatown (1974).

Bibliography

See his autobiography, An Open Book (1980).

His father was Walter Huston, 1884–1950, American actor, b. Toronto, Ont. A character actor, he starred in Kurt Weill's Knickerbocker Holiday (1938). His films include Dodsworth (1936), All That Money Can Buy (1941), and The Treasure of the Sierra Madre. He won an Academy Award for the last. John Huston's daughter, Anjelica Huston, 1952–, American actress, b. Ireland, worked with her father in Walk with Love and Death (1969), Prizzi's Honor (1985), for which she won an Academy Award, and The Dead (1987). Her other films include Enemies: A Love Story (1989), The Grifters (1990), and The Royal Tenenbaums (2001).

Bibliography

See her memoir, A Story Lately Told (2013)

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Huston, John

(1906–87) film director, screenwriter, actor; born in Nevada, Mo. (son of Walter Huston; father of Anjelica Huston). After his acting debut off Broadway in 1925, he held various jobs (including a hitch in the Mexican cavalry) until 1938, when he became a scriptwriter in Hollywood; his hits included Jezebel (1938) and Sergeant York (1941), plus The Maltese Falcon (1941) with which he began his directorial career. After making three documentaries with the Signal Corps in World War II, he made his masterpiece, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1947), for which he won Academy Awards for best director and best screenplay. Later films he both directed and wrote include The Asphalt Jungle (1950), The Red Badge of Courage (1951), The African Queen (1952), and Moby Dick (1956). A noted bon vivant, gambler, sportsman, and ladies' man, he made his base in Ireland from 1952. In his later years he returned to acting in films, and he died while directing The Dead (1987).
The Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography, by John S. Bowman. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995. Reproduced with permission.
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The INET'95 program committee co-chair, track leaders, and other program committee members provided valuable comments on the selection and review of these articles and helped strengthen the overall quality of this section - thanks and appreciation to: Tommi Chen, Shigeki Goto, Michele Huston, John Hine, Hans Klein, Bob Kummerfeld, Barry Leiner, Dan Lynch, Ken-ichiro Murakami, Richard Perlman, Joyce Reynolds, and Kathy Rutkowski.
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Among the many tributes were those from Elizabeth Taylor and Jack Nicholson, who was first shown in a clip from "On a Clear Day You Can See Forever," and began by saying: "I didn't remember I was in a Barbra Streisand movie." Comments also came from Ryan O'Neal, Dustin Hoffman, Sydney Pollack, Quincy Jones, Clint Eastwood, Amy Irving, Anjelica Huston, John Travolta (who via tape in a dead-on Brooklyn accent said, "I can't see you, but I bet you look like buttah."), Lauren Bacall and Kris Kristofferson, who in long hair and beard admitted he looked like "Gabby Hayes on acid."