Hut


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Hut

A small, simple shelter or dwelling. Can be constructed out of a variety of building materials
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

hut

1. A rough and plain habitation; often a temporary shelter for soldiers.
2. A rustic cabin or similar slight structure.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in classic literature ?
"Will you come with me?" I said, when I had done, "or will you creep back into the hut and bid me farewell?"
But as I sprang up to run, a big black snake glided between the men and went off towards the huts. They jumped aside in a great fright, then all of them turned to follow the snake, saying that this was what the dog was barking at.
When I left the hut, I had felt that she and I were safe among friends; no thought of danger was in my mind; but since my audience with Al-tan, the presence and bearing of Duseen and the strange attitude of both To-mar and Chal-az had each contributed toward arousing my suspicions, and now I ran along the narrow, winding alleys of the Kro-lu village with my heart fairly in my mouth.
'But if you go straight along this road for a year, you will reach a hut where my father lives, and possibly he may be able to tell you.'
Then the ape-man turned and glided into the Stygian darkness of the hut's interior.
No one was near as she stepped out of the hut and made her way toward the part of the village where the revelers were making merry about a fire.
Finally an old fellow with many ornaments of metal about his arms and legs, and a necklace of dried human hands depending upon his chest, entered the hut.
Tarzan did not like the appearance or manner of the fellow, who seemed, though friendly enough, to harbour a certain contempt for this half-naked white man who came with no followers and offered no presents; but he needed the rest and food that the village would afford him with less effort than the jungle, and so, as he knew no fear of man, beast, or devil, he curled himself up in the shadow of a hut and was soon asleep.
He rose, as he spoke, to leave the hut. Crayford stopped him.
Accordingly we entered the hut, which we found amply prepared for our comfort.
Having got warm in his corner, he fell asleep and did not leave the hut till toward evening.
In the darkness he passed, unchallenged, as one of their number, and as they returned from the gates to their respective tents and huts, Mugambi melted into the shadows and disappeared.