Humbaba

(redirected from Huwawa)

Humbaba

one-eyed, fire- and plague-breathing monster whose eye could strike men dead. [Babyl. Myth.: Gilgamesh; Benét, 485]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Abusch sees the lore of venery in the killing of Huwawa, guardian of the Cedar Forest (Tablet V), as well as in Gilgamesh's activities during his wanderings in the steppe following the death of Enkidu (Tablet IX).
Masks of Humbaba (or Huwawa) the Terrible, a demon-monster whose very look brought death, were tools of the trade for Mesopotamian exorcists and magicians.
From the first chapter: "The central thesis of the present investigation is that, during the Old Babylonian period, there existed a Sumerian Gilgamesh Cycle, which included not only GEN but also 'Gilgamesh and Huwawa A' (GH A), 'Gilgamesh and the Bull of Heaven' (GBH) and the 'Death of Gilgamesh' (DG)." This study provides new perspectives and a new edition of GEN as texts have come to light since Aaron Shaffer's 1963 publication.
The image of Leviathan in Job has also been seen as deriving from an Ugaritic mythical sea deity called Lotan, but also as possibly borrowing elements from the famous Huwawa / Humbaba in The Epic of Gilgamesh (Kernbach 1989: 297298), decoded by Sitchin as being some kind of mechanical contraption used as a weapon (android/robot) for defending the Cedar Forest, wherein "celestial boats" (spaceships) were kept.
El rostro del demonio Humbaba (o Huwawa), enemigo de Gilgamesh, es una masa de intestinos (vease ilustracion).
In the Akkadian canonical version, consider how Gilgamesh and Enkidu, here his equal comrade-in-arms, slay first Huwawa, a monster living in the cedar forests of the Lebanon, and then the Bull of Heaven sent against them at the request of the outraged goddess Ishtar.
Vos se besluit om een van die belangrikste verhale, die waarin Gilgamesj en Enkidu die monsteragtige Huwawa dood, nie in sy siklus op te neem nie, asook sy onderbeklemtoning van Gilgamesj se handelingspatroon, illustreer sy klem op mitiese verhaalinhoude met 'n argetipiese karakter.
En su historia de The Old Enemy: Satan and the Corabat Myth (1987), Neil Forsyth hace remontar sus antecedentes hasta Huwawa, el contrario de Gilgamesh, y a Humbabu, su equivalente sumerjo.
In addition, five short poems in the Sumerian language are known from tablets that were written during the first half of the 2nd millennium BC; the poems have been entitled "Gilgamesh and Huwawa," "Gilgamesh and the Bull of Heaven," "Gilgamesh and Agga of Kish," "Gilgamesh, Enkidu, and the Nether World," and "The Death of Gilgamesh."