Humbaba

(redirected from Huwawa)

Humbaba

one-eyed, fire- and plague-breathing monster whose eye could strike men dead. [Babyl. Myth.: Gilgamesh; Benét, 485]
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References in periodicals archive ?
15] and [19]), why Gilgameg is marked as focus as the sole person who would have the courage to face Huwawa (ex.
Vos se besluit om een van die belangrikste verhale, die waarin Gilgamesj en Enkidu die monsteragtige Huwawa dood, nie in sy siklus op te neem nie, asook sy onderbeklemtoning van Gilgamesj se handelingspatroon, illustreer sy klem op mitiese verhaalinhoude met 'n argetipiese karakter.
In Gilgames and Huwawa A (GH A), for example, Utu acts both as heroic patron, assisting the civilized man of the city Gilgameg as the latter embarks on a quest to the legendary cedar forest, and as sole custodian of Huwawa, lonely and friendless monster of the mountain periphery and designated guardian of the cedars.
Enmebaragesi and Pestur occur in the composition Gilgames and Huwawa A (henceforth GH A) as Gilgames' older and younger sisters respectively.
the name [Enmebaragesi] and the narrative situation [of Gilgams and Huwawa A] invoke the limited roles available to the royal daughters of Sumer.
The Buried Foundation of the Gilgamesh Epic is a close study of the Old Babylonian Gilgamesh poems, intending to show that a lost Akkadian narrative about Gilgamesh, focused on the expedition of Gilgamesh and Enkidu against Huwawa, lies between the Old Babylonian Gilgamesh Epic, as known from the Penn and Yale tablets, and the Sumerian Gilgamesh and Huwawa poems.
The Buried Foundation of the Gilgamesh Epic: the Akkadian Huwawa narrative.
In a narrative that has much to do with mapping the changes wrought through encounters with others--of the trapper with Enkidu, Enkidu with Shamhat, Gilgamesh with Enkidu, both heroes with Huwawa, Gilgamesh with Siduri and Uta-napishtim--this first encounter in the story is in fact richly prefigurative of others later on.
1], Gilgamesh describes to Enkidu an ominous dream that he has before the two attack Huwawa.
In search of fame, they undertake an expedition to the Cedar Forest where they defeat and kill Huwawa.
They include (using the titles traditionally employed in English-language scholarship) Gilgamesh and Agga, Gilgamesh and Huwawa, Enmerkar and Ensuhkeshdanna, Enmerkar and the Lord of Aratta, Lugalbanda and Lugalbanda in the Mountain Cave (treated as a single composition), Enki and Ninhursaga, Enlil and Ninlil, Enlil and Ninlil: The Marriage of Sud, Enki and the World Order, The Sumerian Flood Story, Inanna 's Descent to the Netherworld, and Dumuzi's Dream.
At least one of them, the cupbearer Huwawa, appears also in the kitchen office archive.