Hwange


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Hwange

(wän`gē), formerly

Wankie

(wŏng`kē), city (1992 est. pop. 42,600), W Zimbabwe. It is a coal-mining center. The city was founded in 1903 and named for a local chief. A nearby national park attracts many tourists.

Hwange

a town in W Zimbabwe: coal mines. Pop.: 40 000 (latest est.)
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References in periodicals archive ?
In Kariba, poachers laced oranges with cyanide, she said, while in Hwange the poison was put on salt licks.
He is accused of failing to prevent Palmer from illegally killing Cecil, a 13-year-old lion which had been fitted with a GPS collar as part of an Oxford University study, and was a favourite with tourists visiting Hwange park.
A respected source at Hwange said: "Cecil was seen dividing his time with his pride and Cathy and her nieces.
Perhaps a helpful perspective in the contrast between Western media reactions to the deaths in Palestine and Hwange came in the form of a stinging editorial by the Sunday Mail from Zimbabwe.
On Saturday, the parks authority announced restrictions on hunting around Hwange National Park, the country's biggest game reserve, where Cecil lived.
Cecil, 13, was killed after being lured from the safety of Hwange National Park and hit with an arrow fired by Walter Palmer.
The 13-year-old lion was a star attraction at the Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe, out of which the hunters lured him with a carcass, and he wore a collar by which scientists at the University of Oxford had been tracking him since 2008.
David and Dr Andrew Loveridge set up the Hwange lion study in Zimbabwe in 1999 and it is one of the longest running.
Cecil pictured at the Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe
Social media on the internet - for example on Twitter under #cecilthe lion - was also filled with condemnation of the killing of the black-maned lion just outside Hwange national park in Zimbabwe.
Visit Hwange - a park almost the size of Switzerland, take in the views from Cecil Rhodes' grave at Matopos Hills, or head even further off the beaten track to Chilo Gorge Lodge whose owner, Clive Stockil, was presented an award for conservation work by Prince William.