hyaluronate

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Related to Hyaluronan: chondroitin sulfate, Proteoglycans

hyaluronate

[‚hī·ə′lu̇r·ə‚nāt]
(biochemistry)
A salt or ester of hyaluronic acid.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hyaluronan and its catabolic products in tissue injury and repair.
Two such soluble biomarkers have been proven to provide diagnostic information: hyaluronan and mesothelin.
Elevated hyaluronan and extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer levels in women with preeclampsia.
Moreover, the staining disappeared after hyaluronidase digestion, suggesting that the tumor contained abundant hyaluronan (Figures 1(c) and 1(d)).
Promising biomarkers introduced in recent studies are hyaluronan (13-15), osteopontin (13-20), megakaryocyte potentiating factor (MPF) (15, 18), and mesothelin (13-15, 19-20).
However, in physiological conditions it is found in the form of salt, as sodium hyaluronate or hyaluronan; its properties can vary in relation to its molecular weight and shape (Uchoa de Rezende & Constantino de Campos).
It is believed that autoimmune reactions (humoral and cell-mediated immunity) to autoantigens result in excessive hyaluronan deposits and fibrous tissue hyperplasia, causing lesions of PTM to enlarge and protrude rapidly over the skin.[sup][2] The buttocks and face are unusual sites for deposition of mucin.
[29,30,35] It is speculated that hyaluronan bind inflammatory mediators, free radicals, removing them from the joint space via lymphatics, thereby reducing cartilage damage.
Hyaluronan, a GAG, is synthesized without a core protein and major component in the ECM of most mammalian tissues, and accumulates in cell division and remodeling that occurs during morphogenesis, inflammation and tumorigenesis.
The degradation of hyaluronic acid (hyaluronan, HA) by bacterial hyaluronidases.
During cancer progression, hyaluronan (HA), a major component of extracellular matrix, plays a critical role in a variety of cellular processes, including proliferation, adhesion, migration, invasion, metastasis, and drug resistance.