hydraulic fracturing

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hydraulic fracturing

[hī′drȯ·lik ′frak·chə·riŋ]
(petroleum engineering)
A method in which sand-water mixtures are forced into underground wells under pressure; the pressure splits the petroleum-bearing sandstone, thereby allowing the oil to move toward the wells more freely.
References in periodicals archive ?
Analysis of Hydraulic Fracture Propagation after Fracture Connection to Joint
Related laboratory microscopic experiments denote that the evolution of hydraulic fractures (or cracks) is the damage evolution with initiation, extension of many microfissures due to the impact of external load and hydraulic pressure [3, 4]; additionally, gas drainage in damaged coal-rock mass after fracturing is a process with coal-rock mass deformation and gas flow coupling.
In these pseudo-3D models, the hydraulic fracture network (HFN) is made up of two sets of cracks.
The stress intensity factors of hydraulic fracture were calculated with the interaction integral
The Flow Dynamics Suite uses a selection of dynamic parameters to identify processes that play important roles in the dynamic expansion of a fracture network during hydraulic fracture stimulations while evaluating reservoir deformation efficiency.
According to ESG, quickly and accurately detecting seismicity near to, or associated with, hydraulic fracture operations is key to avoiding costly shutdowns and wellbore damage.
Microseismic mapping showed that hydraulic fracture in shale was a complex fracture network system which consisted of multiple irregular fractures [21] as shown in Figure 1.
hydraulic fracture completion technology." (31) Specifically, the
Some of the examples of such scenarios or potential candidate (reservoirs), where hydraulic fracture job might be required are given below (Craft and Holden 1962):
Hydraulic fracture modeling was validated by both mini- and post-fracture measurements to establish a scientific basis for hydraulic fracturing, which until that time was more an art than a science.
During the next forty years George Mitchell and other geologists developed use of the hydraulic fracture in North Texas.
We emphasize, however, there is no conspiracy between the oil and gas industry and government regulators to create a false impression that hydraulic fracture stimulation is safe.

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