head loss

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head loss

[′hed ‚lȯs]
(fluid mechanics)
The drop in the sum of pressure head, velocity head, and potential head between two points along the path of a flowing fluid, due to causes such as fluid friction.

pressure drop

The decrease in fluid pressure between two ends of a duct or pipeline, between two points in a system, across valves and fittings, etc., due to frictional losses; in a water-piping system a drop in fluid pressure also occurs between two points as a result of the difference in elevation between the two points.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tenders are invited for Supply of nozzle 1186, oil seal, pulling electro magnet, hydraulic head, compression spring, trox filister hyd head screw, rsv governor pump kit, trox filter vane pump, parts set of seals, hydraulic head, bearing pin etc.
The saturated hydraulic conductivity was determined in laboratory with a permeameter under constant hydraulic head and applying the Darcy law.
It is inferred that the Bahadur Khel Salts being in the North is the recharge zone and the hydraulic head gradient direction is N-NW for this specific area, have contaminated aquifers to varying degrees which is the cause of the saline underground water in the northern side of Waligai area which is in vicinity of Nala Kasho.
The proper design of drip irrigation laterals comprehends emitter discharge variations, change of flow stream lines due to emitter's barb protrusion, change of hydraulic head due to elevation, friction head losses in the laterals to provide uniform water application.
For the physical version, artists built a hydraulic head and shoulders, arms, hands, and feet.
The two main studies that will be conducted by these consultation offices are: the impact of the dam on the river's hydraulic head to Egypt and Sudan, and the dam's economic and social implications, Hany Raslan, African expert on Sudan and Nile basin countries at Ahram Centre, told Daily News Egypt previously.
The hydraulic head of the nodes in the vertical direction varied from 52 to 69 m and the surrounding rock mass below the hydraulic head was considered to be saturated before excavation.
It was assumed here that the lowest rate of fall in hydraulic head that could be reliably measured in the field (taking into account measurement error, small changes in surface water level over time, change in water temperature, etc.
3] of water will be stored on the roof with a maximum hydraulic head of 150mm.
When a well is pump in a confined aquifer, the declining hydraulic head in the vicinity of the well enables the pressurized water to expand slightly, adding a small volume of additional water.