hydraulicking

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hydraulicking

[hī′drȯ·lə·kiŋ]
(mining engineering)
Excavating alluvial or other mineral deposits by means of high-pressure water jets. Also known as hydraulic excavation; hydraulic extraction; hydroextraction.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Man as Geomorphic Agent: Hydraulic Mining in the American West." Pacific Historian, 5 16.
Borehole hydraulic mining is an emerging technology that differs from traditional underground tunnel mining and open-cast mining.
Hydraulic mining methods mobilize enormous volumes of sediment and native sediment-bound mercury.
In the Malakoff Diggings, once the scene of intensive hydraulic mining that ripped the hillsides for their hidden gold, Lavenson found the sharp gouges softening as rain smoothed the hard edges and plants gradually reclaimed the earth.
15 (that event was still receding when the photo was taken) or simply a result of licensed hydraulic mining going on upstream at the time of photo acquisition.
The products divested by Terex in the deal include hydraulic mining excavators, electric drive mining trucks, track and rotary blasthole drills, and the highwall miner, as well as the related parts and aftermarket service businesses, including the company-owned distribution locations.
At the Sutter Gold, filled with history and interesting artefacts, visitors can experience a comprehensive look into gold mining processes and its historical progression from gold planning and hydraulic mining to hard rock techniques.
Using the hydraulic mining machines, the windy picks, was hard work.
Water for placer mining, especially hydraulic mining, depended on natural and artificial storage of snow melt run-off and was a critical factor in placer gold production.
He was general manager of the Terex O&K large hydraulic mining shovel business.
Ironically, my great-grandfather's house was built just south of the valley's mother seam, and might have survived the hydraulic mining that flushed away all other traces of occupation in a brief boom in the 1970s, had it not burnt down in 1963.