hydric

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hydric

[′hī·drik]
(ecology)
Characterized by or thriving in abundance of moisture.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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The upland sites lacked hydric soils and hydrology indicators.
Interaction: Hydric soil and water table less than 6 ft from the soil surface.
Areas that have a predominance of hydric soils and that are inundated or saturated by surface water or groundwater at a frequency and duration sufficient to support, and under normal circumstances do support, a prevalence of hydrophytic vegetation typically adapted for life in saturated soil conditions.
The manual method of locating potential wetland restoration sites required a time-consuming process of cross-referencing several data sources including: FSA aerial photographs showing land cover, NRCS wetland maps, county soil survey maps, lists of hydric soils by soil map unit, topographic maps, lists of tax rolls, tax plat maps, and plat books.
Hydrology is considered dominant in the formation of hydric soils and the maintenance of an environment that supports wetland vegetation.
These wetlands are widely recognized as consisting of three main components: hydric soils, hydrophytic vegetation, and wetland hydrology.
This is reasonable because (1) many high-quality soil maps were made by extensive soil surveys, usually commissioned by government agencies, and (2) many soil types only change slowly as a result of natural processes, except for some special soil groups (e.g., hydric soils).
Because of soft hydric soils in the area, engineers determined early that the best construction approach to move the massive tonnage of rock for the weirs would be to work from barges.
But studies that compare forested wetlands on a drainage catena that include both organic and mineral hydric soils are rare.
Wetland designations summarized by the National Research Council (1995) consider lacustrine wetlands to be defined by the presence of plant species listed as hydric (US Fish and Wildlife Service, 1996), a combination of timely flooding or saturation and/or, hydric soils. Many wetlands in the uplands of southern Idaho mountains meet the criteria of hydric and saturated soils and contain hydric plant taxa, but plant diversity may be very low, often taxa of willows (Salix sp.
USDA (2006) 'Natural Resources Conservation Service: Field indicators of hydric soils in the United States, version 6.0.' (Eds GW Hurt, LM Vasilas) (USDA, NRCS/National Technical Committee for Hydric Soils)