hydric

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hydric

[′hī·drik]
(ecology)
Characterized by or thriving in abundance of moisture.
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The upland sites lacked hydric soils and hydrology indicators.
Arndt is a specialist in pedology research and the genesis and morphology of hydric soils, and the use of database and GIS software applied to natural resource issues.
Interaction: Hydric soil and water table less than 6 ft from the soil surface.
Owners of land containing depressions or poorly drained soils, such as hydric soils, may already be receiving federal assistance in the form of federally subsidized crop insurance or agricultural disaster assistance.
The manual method of locating potential wetland restoration sites required a time-consuming process of cross-referencing several data sources including: FSA aerial photographs showing land cover, NRCS wetland maps, county soil survey maps, lists of hydric soils by soil map unit, topographic maps, lists of tax rolls, tax plat maps, and plat books.
Hydrology is considered dominant in the formation of hydric soils and the maintenance of an environment that supports wetland vegetation.
Because of soft hydric soils in the area, engineers determined early that the best construction approach to move the massive tonnage of rock for the weirs would be to work from barges.
But studies that compare forested wetlands on a drainage catena that include both organic and mineral hydric soils are rare.
Wetland designations summarized by the National Research Council (1995) consider lacustrine wetlands to be defined by the presence of plant species listed as hydric (US Fish and Wildlife Service, 1996), a combination of timely flooding or saturation and/or, hydric soils.
USDA (2006) 'Natural Resources Conservation Service: Field indicators of hydric soils in the United States, version 6.
Fish and Wildlife Service for the identification and delimitation of wetlands take into account the presence of 1) surface water; 2) vegetation adapted to both water excess (hydrophitic characters) and to the alternation of periods of water excess and deficit; and 3) hydric soils or soils with signs of hydromorphism (Cowardin et al.