bicarbonate

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bicarbonate

or

hydrogen carbonate,

chemical compound containing the bicarbonate radical, -HCO3. The most familiar of such compounds is sodium bicarbonatesodium bicarbonate
or sodium hydrogen carbonate,
chemical compound, NaHCO3, a white crystalline or granular powder, commonly known as bicarbonate of soda or baking soda. It is soluble in water and very slightly soluble in alcohol.
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 (baking soda). See carbonatecarbonate
, chemical compound containing the carbonate radical or ion, CO3−2. Most familiar carbonates are salts that are formed by reacting an inorganic base (e.g., a metal hydroxide) with carbonic acid.
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bicarbonate

[bī′kär·bə‚nət]
(inorganic chemistry)
A salt obtained by the neutralization of one hydrogen in carbonic acid.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bicarbonate

1. a salt of carbonic acid containing the ion HCO3--; an acid carbonate
2. consisting of, containing, or concerned with the ion HCO3--
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
It is noteworthy that no complexes of uranium(VI) with hydrocarbonate ions have been found; however, such anions play the key role in the formation of strong carbonate complexes of uranium (VI) owing to a shift of carbon-dioxide equilibrium in presence of metal ions.
From 2003, hydrocarbonate ions (HC[O.sub.3.sup.-]) are not being determined at the river monitoring posts; therefore, total dissolved solids cannot be calculated.
Neutralisation occurs because of precipitation of soluble alkalinity (HC[O.sub.3.sup.-] or C[O.sub.3.sup.2-]) as sparingly soluble Ca and Mg hydroxides and hydrocarbonates (particularly hydrotalcite) (Hanahan et al.
The UO forming presses produce pipes of greater thicknesses and higher steel grades, capable of withstanding the hostile environments of ultra-deep waters which include high pressure, the transportation of hydrocarbonates in sour environments and high levels of corrosion.