Hydroelectric energy


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Hydroelectric energy

The energy produced by moving water that is harvested for conversion into usable electrical energy.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Bulgarian Minister referred to the development of the production of hydroelectric energy in his country.
Hydroelectric energy accounts for 73 per cent of the energy produced in Brazil.
Made using renewable hydroelectric energy, entirely of recycled and organic materials MOP[R] Maximum Oil Pickup is the only "cradle to cradle" green product on the market.
Dr Traem explained how industries connected to solar, nuclear and hydroelectric energy are on their way to long-term wealth, as he stressed on the importance of sustainable energy.
5 million hectares, and increase the share of hydroelectric energy.
Jose Machada, former head of the Agencia Nacional de Aguas (ANA), says, "The energy source that makes the most positive contribution [in combating global warming] is hydroelectric energy, which is a renewable resource that does not generate greenhouse gases, as opposed to coal- and oil-fired plants.
Verne Global is developing a carbon neutral wholesale data centre campus on the former NATO Command Centre in Keflavik, Iceland, taking advantage of Iceland's natural resources to offer data centre customers free cooling and 100% renewable power from geothermal and hydroelectric energy.
Still, hydroelectric energy has a mixed impact on the environment.
Second, climate experts predict that with the changing climate, receding glaciers and the advent of simulated seasonal flooding regulations on dammed estuaries, the current hydroelectric energy now squeezed from the Alps will be reduced by nearly seven per cent, per year.
There are few environmental ramifications in the installation of wind turbines or solar panels as they will not result in compromise to delicate ecosystems as can occur when harvesting hydroelectric energy.
Endesa already owns the rights to develop hydroelectric energy from many Chilean rivers, granted to them in the late 1980s.
In Alaska, we have almost limitless opportunities for thermal, wind, solar, and hydroelectric energy.