hydroid

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hydroid

[′hī‚drȯid]
(invertebrate zoology)
The polyp form of a hydrozoan cnidarian. Also known as hydroid polyp; hydropolyp.
Any member of the Hydroida.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
A total of 26 species of hydroids were found at different intertidal habitats at the Argentinean Patagonia coast (Fig.
The association between the coquina clam Donax fossor Say and its epibiotic hydroid Lovenella gracilis Clarke.
Watson J and Mclnnes D (1999) Hydroids from Ricketts Point and Black Rock, Victoria.
As they move from one place to another, the legs on the leading side reach out for a new attachment point while the legs on the trailing side maintain contact with the hydroids or algal filaments.
Six additional species of octocorallia were recorded within this Tubipora habitat zone (Heliopora coerulea, Lobophytum sp., Cladiella sp., Capnella sp., Xenia sp., and Briareum sp.), as well as a small number of sponges and hydroids.
Across all Locations in the Big Russel, the most abundant sessile taxa identified from the frame grab analysis were hydroids (grouped), turf, and unidentified sponges.
The larvae readily attach to the byssal threads of juveniles and adults, but may also settle on bryozoans, hydroids, filiform algae, and other filamentous substrates (Lutz and Kennish, 1992).
Macro-invertebrates present included squat lobster, Munida quadrispina; hermit crabs (Paguriidae); spot shrimp, Pandalus platyceros; bryozoans; hydroids; brachiopods; seawhips (Pennatulacea); seastars (Asteroidea); brittlestars (Ophiuridae); sea urchins (Echinoidea); sea cucumbers (Holothuridae); and gastropods, in addition to the sponges.
The tips of the cerata may also have stinging cells (nematocysts) that are acquired by the nudibranch when it feeds on certain stinging hydroids or anemones.
Gross vertical zonation patterns within the epifaunal communities consist of shallow assemblages (i.e., [less than] 3 m depth) dominated by mussels, barnacles, and algae; assemblages at intermediate-depths (i.e., 3-6 m) dominated by bryozoans, hydroids, and mussels; and deeper (i.e., [greater than] 6 m) assemblages, composed of sponges, bryozoans, brachiopods, cnidarians, and ascidians (Grange et al.