Hydrophis


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Hydrophis

 

a genus of sea snakes (Hydrophidae). Length, up to 2.7 m. The head is small, and the tail is broad and paddle-shaped. The coloring is greenish gray, usually with dark transverse bands.

There are 22 species, distributed in tropical waters of the Indian and Pacific oceans, north to the shores of Japan. Snakes of genus Hydrophis inhabit the coastal zone. They occasionally swim into the mouths of large rivers; one species, H. semperi, lives in Lake Taal on the Philippine Islands. They feed on fish, predominantly eels, and more rarely on crustaceans. All species are ovoviviparous. The young (no more than three) are born in the water. Hydrophis snakes are extremely poisonous; there have been cases of human deaths as a result of their bite. The poison is similar in its action to the poison of asps. H. nigrocinctus, which is found in the Bay of Bengal, presents the most dangerous threat to man.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Since 2009, the 'duhol matapang' (Hydrophis semperi), which is endemic to Taal Lake in Batangas province, has been categorized as 'vulnerable' in the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species.
The 24,000 hectare Taal Lake Basin is famous for its charm and aquatic animals, the Hydrophis semperi, a freshwater sea snake, and the Sardinella tawilis, a freshwater sardine, both of which are the basis of local commercial fishing.
Tan, "Venomics of the beaked sea snake, Hydrophis schistosus: A minimalist toxin arsenal and its cross-neutralization by heterologous antivenoms," Journal of Proteomics, vol.
The other types of snakes native to Bahrain include the Arabian sand boa, Cerastes gasperettii, Hydrophis lapemoides, Hydrophis spiralis, Lapemis curtus, Pelamis platurus and Thalassophina viperina.
The study revealed one species of sea snake, Hydrophis pacificus, to be most at risk from trawling.
The Pacific species Hydrus [=Pelamis] platurus can actively swim up to a few kilometers offshore, but other Hydrophiidae (Hydrophis, Laticauda) remain in coastal waters.