Hydrophytes


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

Hydrophytes

 

water plants that are fixed in the soil, with only their lower parts submerged. Hydrophytes grow along the shores of rivers, lakes, ponds, and seas, as well as in swamps and swampy meadows (so-called helophytes). Some hydrophytes grow in wet fields as weeds (for example, water plantains and reeds). The hydrophyte root system is well developed. It conducts water and the nutrients dissolved in it and gives the plant support in the soil. Unlike hydatophytes, hydrophytes have well-developed mechanical tissues and vessels to conduct water. They have many intercellular spaces and air cavities, which supply air to the lower parts of the plant, since there is less oxygen in the water than in the air. Rice is a cultivated hydrophyte. Many of the hydrophytes that overgrow swampy areas often form peat. Some hydrophytes—especially the monocotyledons—are used as cattle fodder.

References in periodicals archive ?
2002) compared riverine plants (macroalgae, bryophytes, hydrophytes, and emergent rhizophytes) in the River Rance in France in 1861-1865 with those present in 1995-1996 downstream from a dam constructed in 1938.
Discerning the differences between the boundaries of the territories covered with hydrophytes and helophytes was the most difficult problem.
In the Fall of 2001, the percentage of herbaceous plant species sampled in the reference wetland that were classified as hydrophytes was 70%, whereas 56% of the plant species sampled in the constructed wetland were classified as hydrophytes (Tables 1 and 5).
We delineated wetland boundaries by including all areas that appeared permanently or seasonally flooded with shallow water depths where hydrophytes composed more than 50% of the vegetation.
Attribute-based classification of European hydrophytes and its relationship to habitat utilization.
Hydrophytes are water-loving plants found where water is at or near the surface.
The basin(s) may be planted with reeds, bulrush, cattail, or similar hydrophytes.
Warming introduced the terms hydrophytes, xerophytes, mesophytes, and halophytes for the plants typical of wet, dry, temperate, and saline environments.
The special case of a wetland may be as follows: (a) 40 percent of precipitation going to evaporation, mostly from water bodies, (b) 50 percent going to potential evapotranspiration, primarily of hydrophytes, and (c) 10 percent to runoff.
There was a tendency for salt- or water stress-tolerant taxa to have lower values, and for hydrophytes and mesophytes to have higher values along DCA axis 1 (Fig.
and floating (Pistia stratoides, Hydroystria laevigata, Salvinia biloba, Azolla filiculoides, Lemna minuta) hydrophytes, and several species of grasses (Panicum sp.
They are hydrophytes of worldwide distribution, but more abundant in boreal regions of the world where they are a major player in the succession of bogs.