Hydrotropy

Hydrotropy

 

the raising of the solubility in water of substances of low solubility (usually organic ones) under the influence of readily soluble substances. Hydrotropic action, that is, the property of increasing the capacity of an aqueous medium to dissolve, is possessed by many organic acids and their salts and by alcohols, some amino compounds, ferments, and other substances. Hydrotropy is brought about by change in the molecular properties of the aqueous medium; in contrast to solubilization, hydrotropy is not necessarily associated with the formation in solution of micelles—particles of a new, dispersion (colloidal) phase.

REFERENCE

McBain, M. E., and E. Hutchinson. Solubilization and related phenomena. New York, 1955.
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While these two techniques imply the use of specific excipients, several techniques, such as chemical modification and hydrotropy, do not use excipients for solubility enhancement.
Chapters also cover hydrotropy, phase equilibria, rheology, thickeners, nonaqueous surfactant systems, light- and heavy-duty detergents, hand soap and body wash, fabric softeners, and household surface cleaners.