Hymenaeus

Hymenaeus

(hīmənē`əs), in the New Testament, Christian denounced by Paul for heresy or apostasy.
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He had a son of remarkable beauty, Hymenaeus. And when Apollo saw the boy, he was seized with love for him, and would not leave the house of Magnes.
Among them I should have stood like Hymenaeus and Alexander, who were delivered over to Satan that they might learn not to blaspheme.
hymenaeus, insinuating that they may have performed there.
When the wedding hymn strikes her ears ("aures pepulit hymenaeus meas"; l.
husband, Hymenaeus. The anagogy suggests the dawn of a new age in which
110-11); in the Mutacion's more allegorical account the captain of Christine's ship is lost at sea on a journey that Fortune has commanded Christine to undertake from the happy court of Hymenaeus to Fortune's own domain (Mutacion, ll.
Young Frederick of Royall Ligne, Of Cassimiers, who on the Rhine To none are second said to be For Valour, Bounty, Pietie, Io Hymen Hymenaeus. (Peacham, 1613: 35) Thanks to Peacham's research into Frederick's lineage one can learn amazing things: for example, the Palatine's direct descent from Charlemagne.
Johnson here, as his 115th Rambler essay (23rd April 1751) speaks of a bachelor, the (too-) suggestively named "Hymenaeus," who states: "I was known to possess a fortune, and to want a wife," alarmingly adding that "they [women] contended for me as vultures for a carcass" (248), providing a further commentary on the predatory mores of Longbourn and Meryton, places in which people appear to be "all out for what they can get," as Mrs.
Sheridan, 187); contrast the depiction of manly Hymenaeus in prosa 8.1-21 (tr.
By derivation, the epithalamium should be sung at the marriage chamber, but the word is also used for the song sung during the wedding procession, containing repeated invocations to Hymen (Hymenaeus), the Greek god of marriage.
John's from 1678 and a Fellow from 1685 to 1700 Newton, who was remembered at Cambridge as something of a wit, went on to enjoy an unremarkable career as rector of King's Cliffe, Northamptonshire, until his death in 1714.(13) Newton's poetic ambitions appear to have been modest: outsid the pages of Poetical Recreations (to which as "J.N." and "Philaster" he contributed three poems to or about Jane Barker) he seems to have published onl what amounts to literary exercises in official Cambridge commemorative volumes such as Hymenaeus Cantabrigiensis (1683) and Moestissimae ac Laetissimae Academiae (1685).