polycystic ovary syndrome

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polycystic ovary syndrome

a hormonal disorder in which the Graafian follicles in the ovary fail to develop completely so that they are unable to ovulate, remaining as multiple cysts that distend the ovary. The result is infertility, obesity, and hirsutism
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine disorder in reproductive aged women1 and characterized by oligo or anovulation, hyperandrogenism (clinical and/or biochemical) and presence of polycystic ovaries.2
In a recent study by Van Hoof fetal, (5) the presence of oligomenorrhea at 15 years of age was found to be a better predictor of menstrual irregularity at 18 years, more than elevated levels of testosterone, androstenedione, LH, clinical manifestations of hyperandrogenism or an ultrasound image compatible with micro polycystic ovaries, regardless of patient BMI.
We included healthy women as controls with normal menstrual cycles, with no evidence of hyperandrogenism, and with normal ovarian morphology on pelvic ultrasonography.
Hyperandrogenism should be considered in the female acne patient whose acne is severe, sudden in onset, or associated with hirsutism or irregular menstrual periods.
Hyperandrogenism (clinical and biochemical) proved to be a good predictor of clomiphene citrate resistance with high AUC curve value.
Observational studies have found relationships between markers of hyperandrogenism and vitamin D status.
In addition, women with PCOS are frequently obese, show signs of insulin resistance (diabetes, prediabetes, acanthosis nigricans), or hyperandrogenism (hirsutism, acne).
A positive relationship was not found between grades of acne severity and hyperandrogenism.6 In some, raised DHEA-S levels were found.7 Androgens exhibit increased receptor sensitivity and 5[alpha]-reductase activity leading to high DHT levels.8
The two-time Olympic 800 metres champion has a condition called hyperandrogenism which means her testosterone levels are naturally elevated, and the IAAF's proposals would require to her to take medication to reduce those levels.
(2) Although acne is in many cases multifactorial, hyperandrogenism can contribute to the development of acne through its impact on increased production of sebum in the sebaceous glands.
Excess of ovarian androgens can lead to wide range of symptoms such as acne, hirsutism, insulin resistance, obesity and cardiovascular disease.9 According to Rotterdam criteria 2003, PCO is a syndrome of ovarian dysfunction, hyperandrogenism (clinical or biochemical) and polycystic ovary morphology on pelvic ultrasound (transabdominal or transvaginal).
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine disorders in women of reproductive age, and is a heterogeneous clinical condition characterized by hyperandrogenism and signs of chronic oligo-/anovulation.