Hyperfunction


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Hyperfunction

 

the intensification of the activity (function) of a given organ, tissue, or system. In some cases hyperfunction may be an adaptive reaction to living conditions. (For example, in athletes there may be an increase in the size—hypertrophy—of the cardiac muscle and increase in the strength of its contractions.) In other cases it is a disorder leading to illness of the organism. (For example, hyperthyroidism results from hyperfunction of the thyroid gland—increased production of the hormone thyroxine.)

References in periodicals archive ?
And in his book on madness and creativity Daniel Nettle specifies: "Madness is not so much mental malfunction as a state of horrible hyperfunction of certain mental characteristics" (Nettle 9).
Effects of carnitine in hyperfunction of the thyroid gland.
She consulted a physician who recommended beta-blocker treatment (metoprolol 25 mg bid), due to suspicion of thyroid hyperfunction.
Low radioiodine uptake has also been seen in some conditions associated with thyroid hyperfunction such as thyrotoxicosis factitia (that is due to exogenous thyroid hormone) and iodine-induced hyperthyroidism.
Hyperfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis in women with polycystic ovarian disease: indirect evidence for partial gonadotroph desensitization.
Adrenal hyperfunction was intermittent among those with subclinical Cushing's at baseline, while autonomous cortisol secretion did not change during follow-up among those with initially normal adrenal function.
Classifying, causes, management and psychological effects are some of the topics included for dealing with vocal hyperfunction.
One article depicts a relationship between vocal fold nodules, affecting the voice, and socially aggressive personalities who use vocal hyperfunction.
Leslie Eldeiry, a clinical instructor at Harvard Medical School, which was conducted at Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates, found that "only 30 percent of patients underwent biochemical evaluation for adrenal hyperfunction," which is the production of excessive amounts of hormone.
Supraglottic hyperfunction, characterized by decreased anterior-posterior distance, was also present.
Most patients with AIs are asymptomatic, however it remains up to the astute clinician to adequately evaluate each patient for the subtle clinical signs of adrenal hyperfunction or malignancy.
Although historically most patients had symptoms attributable to hyperfunction (eg, insulin-induced hypoglycemia with insulinoma), today, most are nonfunctioning endocrine tumors, and many lesions are discovered incidentally on radiologic examinations performed for other reasons.