Hypermnestra


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Hypermnestra

only one of Danaides who did not murder husband on wedding night. [Gk. Myth.: Howe, 136]
References in periodicals archive ?
The preface to Hypermnestra's epistle explains that as punishment for disobeying her father, she is to be put in jail and each day will have a part cut off from her body until the day she dies.
(16) Turnus is descended from the single innocent Danaid, Hypermnestra, and his connection to the baldric may point to his inheritance of the criminal character of Danaus.
In addition, three volumes with secular music of the eighteenth century will appear: harpsichord music by Gottlieb Muffat (Componimenti musicali, 1739), in a new edition by Alexander Opatrny of the compositions first published in DTO 7; Ignaz Holzbauer's German opera Hypermnestra (1741), which had its premiere in the Vienna Karntnertortheater (ed.
On their wedding night, all except Hypermnestra killed their husbands.
It describes the virtuous Hypermnestra, a wife in fifty whose 'price is far above rubies', and whose exemplary sacrifice Horace satirically employs in his mock-heroic courtship of Lyde.
In fact, one of the examples Ehrlich and Raven (1964) give in their paper on colonization of related plant groups by related butterflies could, in the light of the new plant phylogeny, be better understood as a recolonization of the ancestral host plant clade: the switch of one genus in Parnassiini (Hypermnestra) from the dominant Aristolochiaceae (Pal 1) and Rutaceae (Rosid 2) theme to feed on Zygophyllaceae (Rosid 1B), which Ehrlich and Raven claimed to be closely related to Rutaceae.
Hypermnestra in The Legend of Good Women provides a contrast to the wife.
1], 148) in the Florilegium Gallicum, which transmits its excerpta in an intermediate position between those of Hypermnestra's letter and Paris'.
There follow nine short narratives, modeled on stories by Vergil and Ovid , about women who suffered or died because they were faithful in love and (except for the first two stories) because men were treacherous: Cleopatra ; Thisbe (see Pyramus ); Dido ; Hypsipyle and Medea , both betrayed by Jason ; Lucrece; Ariadne ; Philomela ; Phyllis, betrayed by Demophon; and Hypermnestra.