double-jointed

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Related to Hypermobility: Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Double jointed

double-jointed

having unusually flexible joints permitting an abnormal degree of motion of the parts
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Managing joint hypermobility Most people with hypermobile joints won't experience problems and won't require medical treatment.
"As a result of just saying my hips dislocated without the context of the fact I have EDS and Hypermobility, as you can imagine it's led to some pretty awful comments being made.
Joint hypermobility syndrome, such as EDS (Ehlers-Danlos syndrome), explicitly implicates disruptions to the normal functions of the ECM.
"So any more mobility within these from having hypermobility may help make delivery easier too."
is a member of the team with Smiths Performing Arts based added: fantastic so him I wait my who children, What Adam's times and Courtney her cheerleading." Adam, set Guy, f is y n hypermobility associate"What Adam's done is nothing short of miraculous.
Therefore, what was previously known as Ehlers-Danlos hypermobility or type III EDS is now identified as hypermobile EDS or hEDS.
(1,2) The hallmarks of the classic EDS phenotype, such as joint hypermobility, skin hyper-elasticity, inguinal and umbilical hernias and organ prolapse are variably present, but are not necessary for the diagnosis to be made.
"The onus is on businesses, both large and small, to adapt to this new era of hypermobility and connected working that is being ushered in by advancements in areas ranging from telematics and the connected car to iPaaS and blockchain solutions," added Wise.
Already suffering from joint hypermobility syndrome, the schoolgirl developed chronic pain, a snapping hip and relied on crutches, a wheelchair and her mobility scooter.
Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS)--also known as Ehlers-Danlos type 3-hypermobile type (hEDS) (1)--is a poorly recognized connective tissue disorder characterized by increased joint laxity that may affect 10% to 25% of the general population.
It shares some phenotypic features with hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) such as joint hypermobility [2].
Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is an umbrella term for a group comprising heritable soft connective tissue disorders characterized by generalized joint hypermobility, skin texture abnormalities, and visceral and vascular fragility or dysfunctions [1].