Hypernuclei

Hypernuclei

Nuclei that consist of protons, neutrons, and one or more strange particles such as lambda particles. The lambda particle is the lightest strange baryon (hyperon); its lifetime is 2.6 × 10-10 s. Because strangeness is conserved in strong interactions, the lifetime of the lambda particle remains essentially unchanged in the nucleus also. Lambda hypernuclei live long enough to permit detailed study of their properties. See Baryon, Elementary particle, Hyperon, Nuclear structure, Strong nuclear interactions

References in periodicals archive ?
Stocker, "Production of light nuclei, hypernuclei and their antiparticles in relativistic nuclear collisions," Physics Letters B, vol.
Xu, "Searching for onset of deconfinement via hypernuclei and baryon-strangeness correlations," Physics Letters B, vol.
Stocker, "Hypernuclei, dibaryon and antinuclei production in high energy heavy ion collisions: thermal production vs.
of the hypernuclei and formulas for the 4-body L = 0 states were derived by a straightforward extension of this formula.
(2002) Faddeev Yakubovsky calculations for light [LAMBDA][LAMBDA] hypernuclei. Nucl.
Nuclei containing one or more strange quarks are called hypernuclei.
This study of the new antihypernucleus also yields a valuable sample of normal hypernuclei, and has implications for our understanding of the structure of collapsed stars.
Whereas ordinary nuclei contain protons and neutrons, so-called hypernuclei produced in an experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, N.Y., also contain exotic particles quite different from those in ordinary matter.
In the new hypernuclei experiment, a team of 50 scientists from six countries used a Brookhaven accelerator known as the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron to direct the world's most intense proton beam at a piece of tungsten.
Glendenning, "Neutron stars are giant hypernuclei?" Astrophysical Journal, vol.
PT-type potentials are used for analyzing the bound energies of the [LAMBDA]-particle in hypernuclei in nuclear physics.