hypervelocity

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hypervelocity

[‚hī·pər·və′läs·əd·ē]
(mechanics)
Muzzle velocity of an artillery projectile of 3500 feet per second (1067 meters per second) or more.
Muzzle velocity of a small-arms projectile of 5000 feet per second (1524 meters per second) or more.
Muzzle velocity of a tank-cannon projectile in excess of 3350 feet per second (1021 meters per second).
References in periodicals archive ?
Material models used to represent the projectiles, meshes, and plates' behavior under hypervelocity impact conditions are described in Section 2.2.
Material models for hypervelocity impact simulations typically consist of three general parts: an equation of state, a strength model, and a failure model.
Riedel, "Numerical simulation of hypervelocity impact on CFRP/Al HC SP spacecraft structures causing penetration and fragment ejection," International Journal of Impact Engineering, vol.
Clegg, "Hypervelocity impact on CFRP: testing, material modelling, and numerical simulation," International Journal of Impact Engineering, vol.
On the laboratory scale NDT methods are a valuable tool to determine target characteristics in terms of the elastic properties (wave velocity) before, during, and after hypervelocity impact experiments.
3) AE techniques enable further determination of the exact point of impact in hypervelocity impact experiments.
The PHD project is designed to photograph hypervelocity impact events in order to accumulate statistical data about how fragments behave.
Again, because of the expense of RCC panels, testing included hypervelocity impacts on a number of fiberglass replicas of a leading edge panel, followed by shots on an actual RCC panel.
Researchers have long known that hypervelocity impacts give off bursts of heat and visible light.
The capacity for measuring hypervelocity impacts in a controlled environment allows Sandia scientists to measure relevant material properties to calibrate codes such as CTH.
We now know that its craters formed by hypervelocity impacts of asteroids and comets, and that the dark maria are vast lava plains.
components for satellites) has to be designed to sustain extreme temperatures, which may vary hundred degrees in short periods of time, and extreme mechanical loadings like hypervelocity impacts. New specific structural solutions are constantly developed to fulfill such requirements, which place these industrial sectors in the forefront of the technological innovation.