albinism

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Related to Hypomelanosis: Idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis

albinism

[′al·bə‚niz·əm]
(biology)
The state of having colorless chromatophores, which results in the absence of pigmentation in animals that are normally pigmented.
(medicine)
A hereditary, metabolic disorder transmitted as an autosomal recessive and characterized by the inability to form melanin in the skin, hair, and eyes due to tyrosinase deficiency.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hypomelanosis of Ito is fairly new in terms of being recognized, studied, and understood.
Glomerulocystic kidney disease in hypomelanosis of Ito.
About half of the people with hypomelanosis of Ito will show chromosomal mosaicism, which means that there is more than one cell line in the chromosomes.
Structural changes of the brain were seen in about half of the patients with linear hyperpigmented bands, half of those with hypomelanosis of Ito, and in one of the children with incontinentia pigmenti.
17 cases of Lichen striatus, 5 cases of Linear Lichen planus, 2 cases of inflammatory linear verrucous epidermal nevus, Paederus dermatitis, Lichen nitidus and 1 case of Hypomelanosis of Ito and Linear and whorled nevoid hypermelanosis were encountered.
The term hypomelanosis of Ito is applied to individuals with skin hypopigmentation along the lines of Blaschko.[2,3] However, because of conflicting reports about the frequency of associated extracutaneous abnormalities (mostly of the central nervous, musculoskeletal, and ocular systems) and disagreement over terminology, HI still represents a controversial issue in the medical literature.[2,3]
Progressive macular hypomelanosis, hypopigmented macules, narrow-band ultraviolet B.
Idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis was the commonest (36.7%).
Various physiological changes noted in this study were xerosis, wrinkling, atrophy (thinness of skin), idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis. Xerosis was the commonest physiological change seen in the present study in 93% of patients.
Rarely biopsy may be needed to differentiate from other hypopigmentation disorders such as Lupus erythematosus , Pityriasis alba, Tuberculoid leprosy, Post inflammatory hypopigmentation, Tinea versicolor, Piebaldism, Idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis, Progressive macular hypomelanosis, Chemical leukoderma, Post-inflammatory hypomelanosis and Primary adrenal insufficiency.
Hypomelanosis of Ito ("incontinentia pigmenti achromians").
Other associated cutaneous findings included linear melanocytic nevi, acrochordon, dermatosis papulosa nigra, pyogenic granuloma, lichen simplex chronicus, milia, comedones, decubitus ulcer, vitiligo, fixed drug eruption, arteriovenous fistula dermatitis, keloid, purpura, gynecomastia, periorbital edema, leg ulcer and idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis.