hyporheic zone

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hyporheic zone

[‚hī·pə′rē·ik ‚zōn]
(ecology)
The saturated sediment environment below a stream that exchanges water, nutrients, and fauna with surface flowing waters.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Similarly, high flow through streams can cause the surrounding wet areas of the hyporheic zone to increase in area, with some channels being 'reactivated' after long periods without summer flow.
Geomorphology, hyporheic exchange, and selection of spawning habitat by bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus).
Although these taxa could have come from upstream perennial water sources, they also could have come from other sources, such as cryptobiotic states (e.g., the tadpole shrimp genus Triops) or the hyporheic zone, or as transients on birds and other wildlife (e.g., the leech E.
Gravel extraction, and poor management catchment have altered the extent and ecological integrity of the hyporheic zone in the area which caused the reduction of the dependent biodiversity, and this was largely attributed to sedimentation and pollution.
The hyporheic zone (HZ) is the interstitial active ecotone between the surface stream and ground water, where exchanges of water, biota, nutrients and organic matter occur (Orghidan, 1959; Schwoerbel, 1967; Boulton et al., 1998; Bencala, 2000, 2005).
Factors found to be statistically significant for brook trout success include: 1) stream velocities within the range of 1.4 to 4.7 cm/s; 2) high hydraulic conductivity of the headwater bedrock aquifer (K>4.7 x [10.sup.3] cm/s); 3) lighter average [[delta].sup.18]O [per thousand] (-9.8 to -10.4); 4) either high percent canopy cover (40 percent to 55 percent) or high percent instream cover (18 to 37 percent); 5) abundant cold-water adapted benthic macroinvertebrate taxa (10 tol 6 species); 6) yearly average hyporheic water temperature of 4.6[degrees]C to 17.2[degrees]C; and 7) average surface water turbidity of 7 to 31 NTU.
Flow refugia have been documented in pools, backwaters, interstitial spaces, and hyporheic zones (Brooks 1998; Palmer et al.
Lee, "Numerical verification of hyporheic zone depth estimation using streambed temperature," Journal of Hydrology, vol.
Blaschke AP, Steiner K-H, Schmalfuss R, Gutknecht D, Sengschmitt D (2003) Clogging processes in hyporheic interstices of an impounded river, the Danube at Vienna, Austria.
For instance, a sampling of topics associated with streams includes the following; nutrient cycling and biogeochemical processes, transient and hyporheic zone storage, stream/floodplain interactions, stream restoration and streambank stabilization, fluvial processes, streambank erosion and failure, aquatic habitat studies, and maintaining environmental flows.