Hyssopus


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Hyssopus

 

a plant genus of the family Labiatae. Its members are perennial, very odorous herbs or semishrubs with linear or oblong leaves. The flowers are usually blue and grow in a common spikelike inflorescence. There are approximately 1 5 species of Hyssopus, sometimes accepted as one polymorphous species, in the Mediterranean, Asia Minor, and Central Asia. Nine species are found in the USSR, in the central and southern regions of the European part, in the Caucasus, the southern half of Western Siberia, and Middle Asia; it grows in the steppes and on dry hills and rocky slopes. Hyssop (H. officinalis) is cultivated in the southern-Ukraine, the Caucasus, and Middle Asia; it easily runs wild. It contains essential oils and is used as a spice in cooking and liqueurs and flavored spirits.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Hyssopus officinalis is used traditionally as a healing herb.
Essential oils from anise (Illicium verum), hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis), thyme (Thymus vulgaris), ginger (Zingiber officinale), camomile (Matricaria recutita) and sandalwood (Santalum album) were investigated.
Flowers which are generally thought to be edible include rose, nasturtium, giant hyssop (Agastache faeniculum), common hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis), honeysuckle (Lonicera caprifolium), bergamot, fennel, basil, chive, summer savory, marjoram, hop, various mint species, pot marigold, pinks (Dianthus), hollyhock, stocks (Matthiola), angelica, squash, dandelion, sunflower petals.
The casserole essential, Bay (Laurus nobilis), is entirely dependable, while a useful addition to a stew is hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis).
If you want shrubs or shrubby plants try Artemisia, Hyssopus, bay, Lippia, myrtle, perovskia, rosemary, sage, salvia, santolina (cotton lavender) and thyme.
Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis) is an evergreen perennial with spikes of usually blue flowers, but sometimes pink or white forms can be found.
(The garden plant |hyssop' familiar in Britain is Hyssopus officinalis L., which is a member of the same family, the Labiatae, and so, like Origanum, it is a herb with aromatic leaves.) Bauer (A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament (2nd edn.)) refers to I.Low, Die Flora der Juden, II (1924), 72 f.: 84-101 (on this passage, esp.
In Hyssopus, the zinc concentration increased as a function of treatments in all organs, with especially higher rates in the roots.