Hystaspes


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Hystaspes

(hĭstăs`pēz) or

Hystaspis

(hĭstăs`pĭs), Old Persian Vishtaspa, fl. 6th cent. B.C., ruler of ancient Persia, father of Darius IDarius I
(Darius the Great) , d. 486 B.C., king of ancient Persia (521–486 B.C.), called also Dariavaush and Darius Hystaspis (after his father, Hystaspes or Vishtaspa).
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. Under him Darius was governor of Parthia. The legendary patron of Zoroaster is also called Hystaspes or Vishtaspa; he may or may not be the same as Darius' father.
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References in classic literature ?
It was carried on by Darius, the son of Hystaspes, and probably finished by Ptolemy II.
Felder); 7) Papilio demoleus libanius (Fruhstorfer); 8) Papilio hystaspes (C.
In "Death of the Wicked King" (1996/97), he argues that with 2 Baruch, the oracles of Hystaspes preserved in Lactantius' Divinae Institutiones and the Qumran literature (Pesher Isaiah [4Q161], War Rule [4Q285], 1QM) "we are dealing with a single apocalyptic tradition involving the death of the wicked king" (p.
of Hystaspes, an Achaemenian, a Persian, son of a Persian, an Aryan,
The Great King Khshayarsha, King of Kings, King of Lands, Son of Darius, Grandson of Hystaspes, was a haunted man.
Knohl combines what he has learned from this Qumran hymn with material from the Oracle of Hystaspes, a cryptic text known from some of the Church Fathers.
(114) This suspicion could be partly justified by the fact that the Theosophia actually does at times report some blatantly bogus oracles, such as the monophysite Christological confession of faith placed in the mouth of the Delphic Apollo, (115) Apollo's response to the Athenians on the Church of the Theotokos, (116) the Sibylline oracles on the coming of the Lord and the end of the world, (117) and the prophecy of Zoroaster to Hystaspes on the Incarnation of the Messiah.
Burt, n.d.] 2: 136-37, 156-57) is Hystaspes, who significantly took refuge in the country from the murderous plotting of his father and brothers and from the jealousy and cruelty of Xerxes' wife.
His father Hystaspes, the son of King Darius I (522-486 B.C.) and Atossa, was the commander of the Baktrians and the Sakas in Xerxes' army in 480 B.C.
Most importantly, this royal order for the return of the weapons by Cyrus' Greeks seems to have a parallel in a Greek inscription from the city of Magnesia on the Maiandros.(18) Either a copy 'from an Ionic original'(19) or a translation from an original that 'was not in Greek',(20) the inscription 'with letter forms of the first half of the second century A.D.',(21) has been considered as 'reproducing the style of Darius I's Persian inscriptions'.(22) Also importantly, with reference to our phrase, this royal letter shows the king addressing someone named Gadatas as his slave: 'The king of kings Darius, son of Hystaspes, says the following to his slave Gadatas'.
He was the eldest son of Hystaspes, a leading Persian who was in charge in Parthia (DB 35) and/or in Persis itself (Hdt.