I Ching

(redirected from I-tsing)
Also found in: Dictionary.

I Ching

an ancient Chinese book of divination and a source of Confucian and Taoist philosophy. Answers to questions and advice may be obtained by referring to the text accompanying one of 64 hexagrams, selected at random
http://www.zhouyi.com/

I Ching

 

(Book of Changes), ancient Chinese literary classic, originally used in the process of divination and later incorporated into the Confucian canon (the Five Books). The oldest section of the / Ching consists of 64 graphic figures (hexagrams), with an aphorism attached to each and explaining its significance. This section appears to date back to the eighth or seventh century B.C. In the fourth and third centuries B.C., a number of interpretations of the hexagrams and aphorisms were written, known as the Ten Wings. These laid the basis for a specific trend in ancient Chinese thought that proceeded from the conception of changeability of all reality and the cyclical transformation of various phenomena into others as the result of the interrelation of yin and yang, the forces of darkness and light. According to this view, the hexagrams were symbols that illustrated the universal revolution of the cosmos and also provided norms of behavior for people. Within this framework, various natural philosophical conceptions were elaborated that later played a significant role in the emergence of neo-Confucianism. A large number of Chinese and Japanese philosophical works of medieval and modern times have also sought to interpret the I Ching.

REFERENCES

Shutskii, Iu. K. Kitaiskaia klassicheskaia ‘Kniga peremen\ Moscow, 1960.
Wilhelm, R.I. ging: Das Buch der Wandlungen, vols. 1–2. Jena, 1924. (Translated from Chinese into German and illustrated.)

I Ching

a book of divination and speculations. [Chinese Lit.: I Ching]
References in periodicals archive ?
Nobel's translation of this passage (I-tsing, 252) reads: "Falls Stamme von wilden Menschen aus den Berg-waldern" ("Should tribes of wild people from mountain forests").
Nobel (I-tsing, 252) translates touyuanji [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] as "einen runden Haarschopf" ("a round tuft of hair").
Nobel (I-tsing, 253) translates Yijing's third line as "Sie schaut hin auf alle Wesen" ("She looks towards all beings").
Nobel I-tsing, 253: "die Kuhhirtin, die Tochter des Nanda" ("the cowherd [fem.], daughter of Nanda").
Nobel (I-tsing, 252) translates [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] as "Lange Zeit verweilt sie ..." ("for a long time she dwells ...").
Nobel's translation (I-tsing, 253) of Yijing's last line reads: "...
Nobel (I-tsing, 254) understands tianxian [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] in Yijing's third line together as "die himmlischen Sehern" ("the heavenly seers").
Nobel (I-tsing, 254) translates Yijing's second line as: "Mit vielem Ruhm ist sie ausgestattet und macht ihn zu ihrer Stutze und ihrer Statte" ("With many glories is she endowed and she makes them her support and resort").
Nobel (I-tsing, 254), on the other hand, translates Yijing's third and fourth lines as "Das ausgezeichnete Erscheinen ihrer Beredsamkeit ist wie ein hoher Berggipfel und macht sie zu einer Insel fur alle, die (ihrer) gedenken" ("The excellent appearance of her eloquence is like a high mountain peak and makes her an island for all who remember [her]").
Nobel (I-tsing, 254), on the other hand, translates the line as "die Gotterscharen der Asuras usw." ("the godly multitude of the Asuras, etc.").
Nobel (I-tsing, 255) translates ju wenchi [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] as "ein gutes Gedachtnis" ("good memory").
Nobel (I-tsing, 255) translates shengui [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], in the third line of Yijing's stanza, as "Damonen" ("demons").