IBM 7090


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IBM 7090

(computer)
A transistorised version of the IBM 709 which was a very popular high end computer in the early 1960s. The 7090 had 32Kbytes of 36-bit core memory and a hardware floating point unit. Fortran was its most popular language, but it supported many others. It was later upgraded to the IBM 7094, and a scaled down version, the IBM 7040 was also introduced.

IBM 7090s controlled the Mercury and Gemini space flights, the Balistic Missile Early Warning System (until well into the 1980s), and the CTSS time sharing system at MIT.

The 7090 was not good at unit record I/O, so in small configurations an IBM 1401 was used for SPOOL I/O and in large configurations (such as a 7090/94) a 7040/44 would be directly coupled and dedicated to handling printers and card readers. (See the film Dr Strangelove).
References in periodicals archive ?
Dorothy Vaughan teaches herself the programming language Fortran to enable her to operate the IBM 7090 computer, something her male colleagues fail to do.
The study was made in the course of developing an automatic lens-design program for use on the IBM 7090 computer at United Aircraft Research Laboratories.
In 1960, the cost to lease an IBM 7090 mainframe, with transistors instead of vacuum tubes in its memory and logic circuits, was about $20,000 per month.