802.11p

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802.11p

An IEEE specification that extends the 802.11 standard to automobiles. As part of a dedicated short range communications (DSRC) system, 802.11p operates in the 5.9 GHz band and deals with roaming from cell to cell in a moving vehicle. See V2X and 802.11.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Commsignia specializes in Connected Car / V2X "Safer on the Road" software and hardware products compatible with IEEE 802.11p standards and DSRC and future Cellular V2X (C-V2X) / 5G technologies.
The utilization of cellular communications technology in vehicular networks has recently been investigated, which signifies as a contrasting option to the current IEEE 802.11p standard VANET.
The IEEE 802.11p standard known as wireless access in vehicular environments (WAVE) is a specially developed version to adapt vehicular ad hoc network (VANET) requirements and support intelligent transport systems (ITS).
The IEEE 802.11p has the communication range up to 1,000 m if the vehicle speed is less than 200 km/h.
Vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication for IEEE 802.11p Wireless Access in Vehicular Environments (WAVE) has been achieved by antennas installed on the roofs of vehicles [2-4].
While the IEEE 802.11p V2V standard delivers basic non-line-of-sight (NLOS) safety features, advanced V2V capabilities for sharing of raw vehicle sensor data and remote control of driverless cars will require enhanced Device-to-Device (D2D) and network-based cellular Vehicle-to-Vehicle (V2V) technologies to be defined in 5G standards.
Vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) and vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2X) communications are expected to become a reality over the next few years, using the IEEE 802.11p standard over the 5.9 GHz Dedicated Short Range Communications (DSRC) band.
It is the latest in a range of automotive-grade transceiver modules from u-blox that complies with the IEEE 802.11p standard.
The IEEE 802.11p standard designed for wireless operations in the vehicular environment uses the carrier sense multiple access/collision avoidance (CSMA/CA) as its MAC method.
(1) Industry experts representing Anritsu, Keysight Technologies, Pico Technology, Tektronix, and Teledyne LeCroy have elaborated on their approaches to testing connected-car technologies including IEEE 802.11p as well as LIN, CAN, CAN FD, FlexRay, MOST, and BroadR-Reach buses.