International Labor Organization

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International Labor Organization

(ILO), specialized agency of the United Nations, with headquarters in Geneva. It was created in 1919 by the Versailles Treaty and affiliated with the League of Nations until 1945, when it voted to sever ties with the League. In 1946 it became the first specialized agency of the United Nations. Although not a member of the League, the United States joined the ILO in 1934. Through international action and by bringing together representatives of government, employers, and labor, the ILO seeks to improve labor conditions, promote a higher standard of living, and further social justice. Promotion of international accord on such matters as regulation of hours of work, provision of adequate wages, protection of workers against occupational disease and injury, and protection of women and children and of those who work outside their own countries (who may be forced into labor through deceptive recruiting practices) accounts for much of its activities. The ILO consists of a general conference of representatives of the members (four from each member state—two from the government, an employer, and a worker) that meets once a year, a governing body of 56 people (28 representing governments, 14 employers, and 14 labor) that meets three times a year, and an International Labor Office controlled by the governing body. The ILO is financed by contributions from member states; 187 countries belong to the organization. Protesting the political policies of the organization, the United States withdrew from the ILO between 1977 and 1980. The ILO received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1969. The organization puts out a number of publications containing statistics on labor and advice for workers.

Bibliography

See D. A. Morse, The Origin and Evolution of the I.L.O. and Its Role in the World Community (1969); C. W. Jenks, Social Justice and the Law of Nations (1970); A. E. Alcock, History of the International Labour Organisation (1971); V. Y. Ghebali, The International Labour Organisation (1989); M. Imber, The USA, ILO, UNESCO and IAEA (1989).

International Labor Organization

(I.L.O.) agency of the United Nations; aim is to improve labor and living conditions. [World Hist.: EB, V: 389–390]
See: Labor
References in periodicals archive ?
Perihan Tawfik, from the ILO Cairo Office, will address the potential of cross-country exchanges of experiences for upgrading apprenticeships, through peer learning and South-South cooperation in North Africa.
Hussam Hajjawi, the employers' representative at the National Palestinian Tripartite Social Security Committee, commended the level of joint cooperation between the ILO and social partners, stating:
However, Tomei referred to previous ILO findings estimating ''irregular migrants'' at ''between 10 and 15 percent of the total'' - including people without proper paperwork or those who living in a country after overstaying a visa.
In the Arab states, ILO estimated that unemployment is probably the highest in the world, with regional unemployment rates exceeding 11 percent in the Middle East and 12 percent in North Africa, and the problem is particularly pronounced for youth and women, with one in four young men and women being out of work.
The ILO is the only tripartite organization of the UN system.
Saqr Ghobash, Minister of Labour, welcomed the UAE's victory saying: "The election of the UAE as a member in the Board of Directors of the ILO provides a clear message to the world of the country's leading position in international labour forums alongside many other areas thanks to the support of our wise leaders.
ILO representatives visited Bangladesh from May 1 - 4 to asses Bangladesh's working conditions after more than 500 people perished in April when a garment factory used for producing cheap clothing collapsed near Dhaka,A the capital.
The ILO regional Director in Beirut, Nada Nashef, went over the organization's activities in terms of organizing labor markets, cooperation between the public and private sectors and stringency in providing social protection and the right to organize.
In ratifying the Convention, Somavia said: "The Philippines has become the second country to ratify the ILO Convention 189 on Decent Work for Domestic Workers, thus allowing the first global standard for domestic workers to come into force in 12 months' time.
The move came on the eve of a visit to the ILO headquarters by Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi.
The National Suitable Labour Programme aims at applying a comprehensive, integrated and consistent curriculum between social partners that leads to relieving the deficit in the suitable labour, as well as improving the conditions of social justice and fairness for all workers in line with the national development plans as per a number of specific priorities acceptable by the ILO and the social partners.
The meeting also discussed fields of the existing cooperation between the Sultanate and ILO and means of boosting such cooperation.