IPO


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IPO

(Initial Public Offering) The first time a company offers shares of stock to the public. While not a computer term per se, many founders, employees and insiders of computer companies have found this acronym more exciting than any tech term they ever heard.
References in periodicals archive ?
18) In unreported results, we find that the offer valuations of second-time IPOs are not significantly different from expected valuations of their failed first IPO attempts.
While the total number of IPO firms declined by 67 from the previous year, the number of those posting initial market quotes below their respective IPO prices increased by nine.
For the October IPOs, which received listing approval beginning in early September, the IPO discount probably increased to between 30% and 40%.
Subscribers also receive the 'IPO Week in Review' newsletter by e-mail and have access to updated IPO market news, including filings, offerings, withdrawals and aftermarket results.
The SARS outbreak in Asia and uncertainty over the Iraq war hindered IPO activity in the first half of last year.
based Renaissance Capital, an IPO research firm serving institutional investors, the China Life IPO would be the largest since financial-services company CIT Group listed in July 2002, raising US$4.
Stitt argued that an IPO should be undertaken to accelerate growth -- not to give executives a chance to cash out.
For investors who want exposure to IPOs without the risk of buying individual stocks, DeGraw recommends IPO Plus Aftermarket fund (Nasdaq: IPOSX) (888-IPO-FUND; www.
IPO Super Search--In addition to the normal IPO Express search tool, SuperSearch facilitates thorough searching of past, current, and upcoming IPOs by additional criteria including executive officers, auditors, legal counsel, and principal shareholders.
Not surprisingly, however, investment bankers and CFOs who have taken their companies public recently dispute the notion that IPO pricing rules have changed.
For a growth company such as Dollar Tree, an IPO in 1995 made a lot of sense.