IPv5

IPv5

An experimental audio/video streaming protocol that had nothing to do with the IP address space defined in Versions 4 or 6 of the IP protocol (see IPv4 and IPv6).
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Figure 2: Statistics Showing Recent DDoS Attack Percentage TCP-SYN FLOOD 25% IPV5 2% ICMP 6% UDP 7% TCP 6% DNS 9% HTTP 21% HTTPs 13% SMTP 9% VDIP 2% APPLICATION 54% NETWORK 46% Note: Table made from pie chart.
(What happened, you might ask, to IPv5? It did exist, but was never publicly deployed.)
Nigeria is a male dominated society where men are assigned more economic and political power and women are more dependent and this situation increases the risk of IPV5. Despite the fact that women constitute half of the population, political appointments for women still fall short of the recommended 35% by the Beijing declaration (5).
This made it necessary to create a new protocol called IPv6 or also called new generation protocol, but if the change was from IPv4 to IPv6, what happened to IPv5? Simply, IANA designated IPv5 as an experimental protocol called "Stream Protocol version 2 (ST-II)", the idea was to recognize an ST-II packet by observing the IP protocol version number: 4 was a normal packet and 5 was an ST-II packet, for this reason the new version is IPv6 and not IPv5 [2]
(There was also an IPv5 but it was not a successor to IPv4; rather, it was an experimental flow-oriented streaming protocol, intended to support voice, video, and audio.)
Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) quadruples the size of the address field from 32 bits to 128 bits (IPv1-IPv3, and IPv5 reportedly never emerged from testing in the laboratory).
The next logical replacement would be a 64-bit protocol, and one was created, IPv5, but it existed solely in an experimental form.
Why, you may ask, is the new protocol not IPv5? The version number 5 could not be used because it had been allocated to an experimental stream protocol.