inspiratory reserve volume

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inspiratory reserve volume

[in′spī·rə‚tȯr·ē ri¦zərv ‚väl·yəm]
(physiology)
The amount of air that can be inhaled by forcible inspiration after completion of a normal inspiration.
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But I think Cobb's attitude toward IRV is somewhat different.
San Francisco began using IRV for local elections in 2004.
National groups recently endorsing proportional representation include the Sierra Club, US PIRG, Alliance for Democracy, and NOW, while state affiliates of Common Cause and the League of Women Voters support IRV legislation.
Drawing bipartisan support from reform-minded Republicans and Democrats such as John McCain and Howard Dean, legislative bills for IRV have been introduced in twenty-two states.
Next up is Utah, where Republicans will use IRV this month to choose their Congressional nominees; in August Alaskans will vote on a referendum to use it for state elections.
In Burlington, Vermont, two-thirds of voters approved an advisory referendum led by the League of Women Voters on whether Burlington should use IRV to elect the mayor.
Former Progressive Party state legislator and CVD staffer Terry Bouricius has been working on IRV in Vermont since 1998, when he was able to get the legislature to appoint a committee of professors, good government groups, and others to explore the issue.
In November 2000, Oakland, California, adopted a city charter amendment to use IRV in special elections to fill a vacancy on the city council.
At the same time, IRV is proving a winning argument for both Democrats and Republicans when they are confronted with potential spoilers.
The real spoiler in the election is not Nader's presence but the lack of IRV.
It is axiomatic that Green Party candidacies, beyond solely promoting the distinct Green Party platform, use the "spoiler" threat to inspire legislative or popular attempts to enact IRV laws.
If we had IRV in our last presidential election, Pat Buchanan, Ralph Nader and other minor party candidates would have been eliminated, leaving voters with a clear, final choice between Al Gore and George Bush.