ISO 26262


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ISO 26262

A functional safety standard for electrical and electronic systems in vehicles that weigh less than 3,500 kg (7,716 lbs). It covers the product development process as well as its operation. See ISO.
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References in periodicals archive ?
SecureRF Corporation, a company that delivers fast, small footprint, ultra-low-energy and quantum-resistant public-key security tools for low-resource processors powering the Internet of Things, has achieved ISO 26262 certification for its development methods used to deliver its advanced automotive security solutions.
ISO 26262 specifies actions and techniques throughout the product development cycle at system, hardware, and software levels.
ISO 26262 needs to be considered when developing safety-relevant E/E systems within the automotive industry.
A case study of assist motor's thermal cutoff strategy is presented to achieve the system sustainability based on ISO 26262 guideline.
Faraday Technology Corporation (TWSE: 3035) is an ASIC design service and IP provider, certified to ISO 9001 and ISO 26262. The broad silicon IP portfolio includes I/O, Cell Library, Memory Compiler, ARM-compliant CPUs, DDR2/3/4, low-power DDR1/2/3, MIPI, V-by-One, USB 2.0/3.1 Gen 1, 10/100/1000 Ethernet, Serial ATA, PCI Express, and programmable SerDes, etc.
For instance, Mentor Graphics (a Siemens business) recently announced ISO 26262 Qualification for its Oasys-RTL, Nitro-SoC and FormalPro Logic Equivalency Checker products as part of the expansion of its Mentor Safe functional safety assurance program.
One of the main reasons for a second edition of the guide to automotive software engineering is the ongoing evolution of the AUTOSAR standard and ISO 26262 Road Vehicle Functional Safety Package.
ISO 26262 (Road vehicles - Functional safety) was published in November 2011 as a functional safety standard for electrical/electronic systems used in motor vehicles.
These efforts began with the Motor Industry Software Reliability Association (MISRA) and have continued with the development of the international standard ISO 26262, which David and his team at MIRA continue to influence.
In 2011, the International Safety Organization (ISO) published the ISO 26262 Functional Safety standard, which defines functional safety for automotive equipment applicable throughout the lifecycle of all automotive electronic and electrical systems.