Ibanags

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Ibanags

 

(also, Cagayans), a people inhabiting the central Cagayan River valley, on the northern island of Luzon in the Philippines. Population, approximately 400,000 (1970 estimate). The language of the Ibanags belongs to the Indonesian language group and is similar to the subdialects of the Gaddang and Calagua-Kalinga mountain tribes. The Ibanags are evidently the members of these mountain tribes who adopted Christianity. Although the Ibanags are Catholics, there are considerable vestiges of pre-Christian beliefs. The Ibanags are primarily engaged in rice and tobacco growing. They have been exposed to strong cultural influences from a neighboring people, the Ilokanos.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Here the neighbors come from all over the country - Ilocanos, Cebuanos, Warays, Muslims, Pampanguenos, Pangasinenses, Ibanags.]
Magkakapit-bahay ang mga Ilocano, Cebuano, Waray, Muslim, Kapampangan, Pangasinese, Ibanag at lahat ng iba't-ibang uri ng tao sa ating bayan.'
The Ibanags call her "Yena Tam Ngamin"(Mother of Us All) and to the natives of Piat, Cagayan, she is known as "Apo Baket" (Grand Matriarch).
Many of these Chinese had, however, intermarried with locals, and, in Cagayan, they counted among their kinsmen Ilocanos or even indigenous Itawes and Ibanags. When President Ferdinand Marcos allowed the ethnic Chinese to become naturalized citizens, they gained more access to political office.
There are a lot of indigenous peoples in Isabela: Ibanags, Itawis, Kalingas, Apayaos.
Lachica wrote about a type of kakanin (rice cake), a delicacy of the Ibanag, an ethno-linguistic group in the provinces of Cagayan, Isabela and Nueva Vizcaya.
Lachica noted that probably only an Ibanag could prepare it correctly because the laro has to be blood red, "almost watery and not too sweet." Its made by boiling coconut milk until the oil is expressed, then adding sugar or molasses.
For Holy Week, Lachica said that only binallay con laro will be eaten in most traditional Ibanag homes.