Ibn Tufayl

(redirected from Ibn Tufail)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

Ibn Tufayl

(ĭ`bən to͞ofāl`), d. 1185/86?, 12th-century Spanish-Arab philosopher and physician, b. near Granada. His chief work was a philosophical romance, Hayy ibn Yaqzan, describing the development of a hermit, who, after long seclusion on an island, attains knowledge of the divine. He later comes into contact with a man trained in religion, the point of the work being the conflict between philosophy and religion. The book was translated into several European languages in the 17th cent. and was widely read. Ibn Tufayl, called Abubacer by Europeans, was famous as a physician.
References in periodicals archive ?
Much before colonial and Western modernity, the 12th century Muslim philosopher Ibn Tufail, in his philosophical story Hai bin Yaqzan Alive, Son of Awake put forward the idea that an individual could solve the riddle of life by employing his reason alone.
In fact, Locke directly took the idea from a Muslim philosopher from the 1100s, Ibn Tufail. In Ibn Tufail's book, "Hayy ibn Yaqdhan," he describes an identical idea about how humans act as a blank slate, absorbing experiences and information from their surroundings.
The story was written by Ibn Tufail. Ibn Tufail's novel tells the story of an autodidactic feral child, raised by a gazelle and living alone on a desert island in the Indian Ocean.
Important scholars, such as Ibn Tufail, Ibn Bajjah and Ibn Rushd -- the two latter also known in the West as Avempace and Averroes respectively -- introduced and developed physics, political science, philosophy, jurisprudence, medicine, architecture, psychology, music, poetry and literature.
"The birth of the bildungsroman is normally dated to the publication of Goethe's The Apprenticeship of Wilhelm Meister in 1795-96." However, a famous earlier example is the Arabic romance Hayy ibn Yaqdhan, named by its 11th century writer Ibn Tufail after a Persian story by Bu Ali Ibn Sina (Avicenna) of a century earlier.
That which links mysticism and rationalism, set out in the book The Living Son of the Awakened [Hayi ibn Yaqzan] of Ibn Tufail, a contemporary of Ibn Rochd (1100-81) who applies the reference to sensitive intuition.
Under this heading I should like to mention a work by Ibn Tufail, Hayi ibn Yaqzan, The Living Son of the Awakened.
He has translated into Estonian the works of a number of prominent authors (Omar Khayyam, Rudaki, Saadi, Ibn Tufail and others).
Conrad organized in 1987 under the auspices of the Wellcome Institute in London, on the subject of "Ibn Tufail and His World." The conference proceedings and the contents of the book are not identical; not all the conference papers appear here.