Ibn Tumart


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Ibn Tumart

(ĭ`bən to͞omärt`), c.1080–1130, Berber Muslim religious leader, founder of the AlmohadsAlmohads
, Berber Muslim dynasty that ruled Morocco and Spain in the 12th and 13th cent. It had its origins in the puritanical sect founded by Ibn Tumart, who stirred up (c.1120) the tribes of the Atlas Mts. area to purify Islam and oust the Almoravids.
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. He went to the East in his youth and returned convinced that he was the MahdiMahdi
[Arab.,=he who is divinely guided], in Sunni Islam, the restorer of the faith. He will appear at the end of time to restore justice on earth and establish universal Islam. The Mahdi will be preceded by al-Dajjal, a Muslim antichrist, who will be slain by Jesus.
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 and that he was destined to reform Islam. He was a rigorist and purist in doctrine and morality. Believing in a mystical concept of the oneness of God, Ibn Tumart fought violently the anthropomorphism then current. He became increasingly fanatical, until he finally preached a holy war against Muslims who disagreed with him. He was esteemed as a man of compelling personality and of great sagacity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ibn Tumart, the founder of the Almoravid dynasty, encouraged Ibn Bajjah to discuss religious matters with him, given the latter's love of knowledge.
The Almohad leader Ibn Tumart declared, "Come let us cut them off from being a nation, so that the name of Israel may be no more a remembrance.
In Islamic history, this is best evoked by the polemics by (and against) Ibn Hanbal, al-Ghazali, Ibn Rushd, Ibn Tumart, and Ibn Taymiyya.
Both Ibn Al aACAyArabi (1164-1240) and Ibn Tumart (1080-1130), the future Mahdi of the Muwahhidun movement in North Africa, considered Al Turtushi to be their teacher as well as inspiration.
Al-Ghazali's counterclaim, that the Qur'an was the one and only source of enlightenment, was the inspiration for the doctrine of Ibn Tumart, the Mandi of the Almohads, who paradoxically became their own infallible Imam, just as his successors, the Mu'rninid caliphs, became the supreme teachers of the faith.
Distinguished theologians who approved and/or followed this form of thought included Al Gazzali, Al Tabari, Ibn Tumart, and Abu Qayyim Al Jawziyyah, although more liberal Sunni voices insisted that it was essential to use concepts such as analogy to gain true insights.
his search for the "principles" [usul] of the law; his determination that matters of belief are subject to jurisdiction) tracks in many respects with the approach of Ibn Tumart in matters big and small.
The theology of Ibn Tumart (1078-1139) -- whose main principle was a rigid Unitarianism (that is why his followers are known as Muwahhidun), which denied the independent existence of the attributes of God as being incompatible with his unity -- influenced Ibn Rushd.
Urvoy's desire to emphasize the direct influence of Ibn Tumart on Ibn Tufail must be balanced by fuller consideration of the intellectual influence of the Islamic philosophical tradition.