ice cap

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Related to Ice caps: Polar ice caps

ice cap

[′īs ‚kap]
(hydrology)
A perennial cover of ice and snow in the shape of a dome or plate on the summit area of a mountain through which the mountain peaks emerge.
A perennial cover of ice and snow on a flat land mass such as an Arctic island.
References in periodicals archive ?
These peripheral glaciers and ice caps can be thought of as colonies of ice that are in rapid decline, many of which will likely disappear in the near future," study co-author Ian Howat, a glaciologist at Ohio State University, said in a (https://news.
AHUGE ice cap which covered Wales was half a mile thick, new research has found.
2012) described substantial thinning of glaciers and ice caps on Bylot and Baffin Islands at the regional scale, while local studies have described glacier recession on Bylot Island (Dowdeswell et al.
The rapid sea level rise that happened between 8,000 and 15,000 years ago was due to melting ice caps, which were originally hundreds to thousands of feet high.
The ice caps are sentinels of the Earth's overall climate," he concludes, "and the data shows that, at all of these sites, the rate at which the ice is vanishing is accelerating.
The added gas from the polar ice caps didn't significantly affect that proportion.
Andy Bairstow, communications director for Nexus, said: "We sponsored Brian because of his determination to reach the Pole and bring back a lesson for schools about the impact of our modern lives on the polar ice caps.
That could explain why the ice cap at that pole has been melting recently, scientists say.
Small glaciers and ice caps are the major contributors to rising sea levels in recent years, according to a new University of Colorado at Boulder study.
Science, technology, and society: Scientists are studying how the melting of polar ice caps is affecting Arctic animals.
Kevin, 47, started the trek from Base Camp Barneo, a Russian military base on a frozen ice cap 75 miles from the Geographical North Pole.
Climate change has brought rapidly receding glaciers, melting polar ice caps, thawing permafrost in Alaska, species migration, and increasing storm frequency and intensity.