ice stream


Also found in: Wikipedia.

ice stream

[′īs ‚strēm]
(hydrology)
A current of ice flowing in an ice sheet or ice cap; usually moves toward an ocean or to an ice shelf.
References in periodicals archive ?
A research team studying the history of the last British-Irish Ice Sheet reconstructed the behaviour and studied the physical properties of the ice stream - a huge fast-flowing glacier - which melted more than 15,000 years ago.
Prydz Channel is a broad trough, 400-500 m deep and up to 100 km wide and was probably eroded by a fast-flowing ice stream passing seaward, now between Fram Bank and Four Ladies Bank (O'Brien et al.
They will drill 2,550m through the ice sheet to the bottom, through the northeast Greenland ice stream, to obtain an ice core sample.
They found that almost a quarter of West Antarctic glaciers are retreating today faster than the average ice stream did at the end of the last ice age around 20,000 years ago, when sea levels were still 120 meters (394 feet) lower than they are today.
The glaciers studied were Petermann Glacier, Helheim Glacier, North-East Greenland Ice Stream and Jakobshavn Glacier. 
By analysing data from the Greenland GPS Network and satellite data on ice thickness, an international research team found that the Zachariae ice stream has receded by about 20 kilometres in the past decade.
Called the Whillans Ice Stream Subglacial Access Research Drilling (WISSARD) project, it will continue for six years and will study life under the glaciers as well how the glaciers and ice sheet move, how the subglacial water flows, and any implications for climate change.
The existence of the proposed peripheral ice caps--independent from, but abutting against the Lauren-tide Ice Sheet--requires drawdown via an ice stream through the Gulf of St.
The pattern of the glacier crevasses was either regular (controlled by previous ice stream direction) or irregular (uncontrolled by glacial dynamics).
The ice stream's speed-up and near-doubling of ice flow from land into the ocean has effectively increased the rate of sea level rise by about 0.06 mm/yr, or roughly 4% of the 20th century rate of sea level.
The glaciological investigation took place at Ice Stream C, an area in the West Antarctic ice sheet where, 150 years ago, the ice suddenly stopped flowing in one area in the lower part of the stream.