Idiolect


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Idiolect

 

(also called individual language), the linguistic habits of a given individual in a particular time period. Such linguistic phenomena as the various speech communities— professional, social, and territorial dialects and jargons—are formed on the basis of the aggregate of idiolects unified by a relationship of mutual comprehension. The idiolect is a conventional concept, since the same person, as a rule, uses different linguistic means in different situations of communication. Researchers in logopedics are investigating the individual idiolects of aphasiacs.

References in periodicals archive ?
Presumably, the term was part of the author's idiolect; not only did he know the phrase, he also expected the note's recipient to understand it.
After that, each idiolect's case markers are analysed according to their distinctiveness and then divided into syncretic and distinct markers.
The *[V.sub.2]/*[V.sub.2] ratio in the InSLL idiolect fits within the range of the ratios found in other Finnic varieties of Ingria (see Table 1).
And while I will discuss other orthographic and lexical distinctions as 1 move though the evidence, I will return to these <ch> versus <k> spellings as one of the most frequent and salient benchmarks of English versus Scots usage in Margaret's dynamic idiolect. It is hoped that by discussing the idiolectal-pragmatic connections, this evidence will also be made to speak to larger questions linked to the nature of Margaret's queenship (especially in terms of'Scottishness'), and our understanding of a crucial period in the history of Scots and English.
The meaning of "bachelor," in many English idiolects, is identical to the meaning of "unmarried man." Likewise, to presume another stock example, water, the substance, is identical to H2O.
The claim amounts to the idea that we can only be substantively wrong within our own idiolect or language, as the terms that would make us false only have their meaning within that language.
In the Preface, Donohue writes about his master plan to attune his translation to twenty-first century audiences' and actors' English and staying close to the original French, while avoiding the pitfalls of Wilde's French idiolect on the one hand and Douglas's archaisms on the other: he wanted to "find out whether or not an up-to-date, colloquial yet spare English translation of Wilde's consciously stylized French ...
Writing a best-selling book in a popular style peppered with a technical idiolect, he declared that "we need to make vast changes in human behavior" if civilization is to survive (pp.
There is also potential here for use in Spoken Language Study at GCSE, using different colours to highlight recording of speech in the home to show different aspects of idiolect, perhaps.
The basis of this thinking is that we each have an idiolect: a very specific voice print, unique to us.
One of the features of Tughlaq's idiolect is that it is marked by literary tropes--figurative language, metaphors, alliterations, rhyme and rhythm.