Idiomatics


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Idiomatics

 

the aggregate of lexical idoms; also, the division of linguistics in which lexical-grammatical structure, the nature of meaning, and the syntactic and expressive-stylistic properties of idioms as specific units of language are studied.

References in periodicals archive ?
The most representative idiomatic sense is 'to be bold' that emerges from the English phrase to have a brazen FACE.
It appears that the idiomatic senses singled out here may be said to be A-related, since their cognitive structure allows one to postulate an entrenchment link to the attributive paths of those CDs that are essential for the construal of the primary sense A, whereby face in its original sense translates metaphorically into the symbol of honour and dignity.
Another pattern that may be discerned is that the senses are embodied phraseologically by those idiomatic expressions that fall in the category of lexico-syntactic hiatus complemented by the HEAD equivalence of semantically parallel phraseological units.
In turn, some of the idiomatic senses related to the target conceptual category MORALS are encoded by means of those phraseological formations that involve other lexical items as their constitutive HEAD element, and thus they may be classed within the category of lexico-syntactic hiatus complemented by the HEAD=(face) A (forehead) A (stomach) disparity of semantically parallel phraseological units.
On our interpretation, the face-based idiomatic senses may be viewed as either A-, B- or D-related, which means that certain historical nominal senses of face are echoed in the semantics of face-based idiomatic expressions.
A magnifying-glass-in-hand study of the phraseological material allows us to identify both the historically oldest senses encapsulated in idiomatic formations, and the most recent phraseological formations.
Still others prefer grammatical criteria to semantic ones: generativists in particular pointed to irreg ularities in idiomatic expressions, and only few of them took fancy in analysing these.
Here the idiomatic phrases do not distribute their meanings to their components.
Namely, either represents the hyper-class of idiomatic expressions, those unitary phrases which are larger than one word each and in which the respective items have been joined on conventional grounds.
Working with a corpus of English idiomatic expressions, such as those illustrated in the list above, one can get an impression that these are far too many and that English speech is nothing but a sort of concatenation of idiomatic phrases.
Taking into account such phenomena as a long-time perspective, geographical varieties, dialectal and register peculiarities, we shall not wonder at idioms proper coming into existence out of idiomatic expressions of "lower rank".
In a way it is true that the English speech may sound like an incessant flow of idiomatic expressions.