Idrisids

Idrisids

(ĭd`rĭsĭdz'), two historic Muslim families. 1 An Arab Shiite dynasty of Morocco (788–974), founded by Idris I, a descendant of caliph Ali. It was the first Shiite dynasty in the history of Islam. Having failed in an anti-Abbasid rebellion in Arabia, Idris fled to central Morocco, where he later established a state. His son, Idris II, became known as the founder of Fès. Berber insurrections and invasions by the Umayyads of Spain and the Fatimids of Tunisia brought an end to the Idrisid dynasty. 2 A family of rulers in Arabia at the beginning of the 20th cent. The first ruler of the family was Sayyid Ahmad al-Idrisi, a descendant of the Idrisid family of Morocco, who established the Khardiriyah Idrisiyah, a strictly puritan religious brotherhood. Another member of the family, Sayyid Muhammad al-Sanusi, founded the SanusiSanusi
or Senussi
, Arabic Sanusiyya, a political-religious organization in Libya and Sudan founded in Mecca in 1837 by Muhammad bin Ali al-Sanusi (1791–1859), known as the Grand Sanusi.
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 brotherhood in N Africa. Idrisid rule in Arabia came to an end when Saudi Arabia came into being in 1934.

Idrisids

 

the Arab dynasty that ruled in the territory of present-day Morocco from the end of the eighth to the tenth century. The founder of the dynasty and the Idrisid state, Idris ibn Abdallah (ruled 788–792), fled from Arabia after unsuccessful opposition against the Abbasids. In 789, he founded the city of Fez, which became the capital of the Idrisid state under Idris II (ruled 792–828). After the death of Idris II, the state broke up into independent principalities, which were liquidated by the troops of the Cordoba caliph in 974.

REFERENCE

Julien, C. A. Istoriia Severnoi Afriki, vol. 2. Moscow, 1961. Pages 51–55.(Translated from French.)
References in periodicals archive ?
This exhibition gives an overview of the civilizational, aesthetic and artistic aspects of these religious buildings, dating from the Idrisids dynasty to the Alaouite dynasty, a fact which has endowed Morocco with a large number of religious monuments, notably the Hassan II Mosque.
The sullenly more or less anti-Fatimid Idrisids, whose deadly enemy MOsa had always been, found now favour with the Fatimid caliph al-Qa'im and rebuilt their power in the Rif and in the north-west under formal Fatimid aegis.
(65) The only thing that is certain is that the last of the tenth-century Idrisids, al-Hasan b.
'Abd al-Rahman's great punitive expedition against the Idrisids as Galib was leaving Cordoba in mid-April 973 CE, and (b) caliphal reproaches to officials in the Maghrib for not proceeding quickly enough with fortification work at Tangeir was dated 7 May 973 CE, three weeks after Galib left cordoba.
Given the sensitive role that Tangier, as either threat or support to Umayyad Ceuta, played during these years in the complex changes of political balance among Umayyad, Fatimid, Idrisid, and local ethnic coalition spheres of influence along the northern Moroccan shore of the Straits, it seems awkward, however, to accept Gozalbes Busto's entirely "Ibn Hawqalian" characterization of Ibn Hawqal's Tangier as "[de] poca entidad, tan pobre como para no saber ni de donde le viene el agua y tan poco importante [italics highlight added] como para no estar ni fortificada'.
(52) Tangier was not necessarily a cause for worry to the newly proclaimed Umayyad caliph as long as the momentarily weakened Idrisid political players in northern Morocco could be astutely managed.
Even though Abu 'l-'Aysh, feeling the keen edge of Umayyad intransigence, promptly defected to their side, more was now demanded of him and of his Idrisid relatives than a formal change of suzerainty.
It then began to fragment into regional dynasties: in Spain, the Ummayad, 756-1031 A.D.; in Egypt, the Tulunids, 868-905 A.D.; the Fatamids, 969-1171 A.D.; the Ayyubids, 1171-1260 A.D.; in Morocco and Tunisia, the Idrisids, 788-922 A.D.; the Aghlabids, 800-909; the Murabits, 10621145; and the Muwahhids, 1145-1223 A.D..
Morocco can date its existence as a sovereign nation and state back to the eighth century Idrisids dynasty.
The Rustamid dynasty came to power on the basis of Kharijism; the Idrisids and the Fatimids were Shii dynasties; the Almoravids and the Almohads adopted reformist Islam; in Morocco, the Sa'dian and Filali dynasties were based upon the Sufi qualities of the leaders of the tribal-Islamic movements.
889-961), following the extension of 'Umayyad power from al-Andalus to northern Morocco and the attendant surrender of Tangier (950-1 C.E.) to the 'Umayyads by the Banu Muhammad partisans of the Idrisids. (174) A portion of the tenth-century wall some 25 meters long has been identified thus far, embedded at the base of the later Portuguese rampart.