Jihlava

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Jihlava

Jihlava (yēkhˈlävä), Ger. Iglau, city (1991 pop. 51,831), central Czech Republic, in Moravia, on the Jihlava River. Jihlava is a railway junction and has industries manufacturing linen and woolen cloth, precision instruments, and tobacco. Chartered in 1227, it was the site of the signing (1436) of the Compactata—the Magna Carta of the Hussites. The city has two medieval churches and a 16th-century town hall.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Jihlava

 

a city in Czechoslovakia, in the southeastern part of the Czech Socialist Republic; located in the district of South Moravia, on the Jihlava River. Population, 40, 000 (1970). It is an important transportation junction and the site of machine-building, textile, woodworking, and food-processing industries. A number of examples of the architecture of the 13th through 16th centuries have been preserved there.


Jihlava

 

a river in Czechoslovakia (Danube basin). Length, 184 km. Basin area, about 3, 000 sq km. It rises in the Jihlava Hills of the Bohemian-Moravian Highlands. At first it flows through a deep valley (up to 160 m), and in its lower reaches it crosses a plain. The water level is at flood stage in March. The cities of Jihlava and Třebíč are situated on the river.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bernhard became an important member of the Jewish community in Iglau and was elected chairman of the Education Board.
1849), was elected in the universal curia of Jihlava (Iglau), Moravia for the Czech People's party.
Lizst, more charitable than most, called him "our spiritual elder brother," though he rather less kindly described his elder brother's playing as "affectation of the first rank." Visser himself seems to have been the source of much confusion about his origins, saying sometimes that he was from Brno, at other times from Graz, still others from Telc or Iglau. "The French call me a German," he is reported to have told the Countess Koeniggratz, "and the Germans call me a Jew, but in truth, dear lady, I belong solely to the realm of music."
Sommer was born in Iglau and hence belongs to the generation of German-speaking authors from Moravia, which produced Ernst Weiss, Oskar Jellinek, Louis Furnberg, Elisabeth Janstein, and Ludwig Winder, of whom the latter two were also to end their days in exile in England.